Politics

The Conversation: 9 Essential Reads On The Supreme Court And Gerrymandering

Jun 20, 2018

On June 18, the U.S. Supreme Court kicked a closely watched case on gerrymandering back to the lower court.

Gerrymandering – where states are carved up into oddly shaped electoral districts favoring one political party over another – has ignited debates in a number of states, including North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Maryland.

President Donald Trump
WhiteHouse.gov

President Trump will be in South Carolina next Monday campaigning for Governor Henry McMaster's bid for a full term.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Government Center.
Nick de la Canal / WFAE

Mecklenburg County has a new budget that includes a tax increase and a slight boost in pay for teachers.  Commissioners approved the spending plan last night. 

The Supreme Court of the United States.
Matt Wade / Wikimedia Commons

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on two closely watched gerrymandering cases Monday but sidestepped the main issue — whether it's illegal to draw districts to give an unfair advantage to one party.  Experts say the issues could be more clear cut in a North Carolina case pending before the court. Justices could announce as early as next week if they plan to hear the case this fall.

Wikimedia Commons

The Trump administration is catching heat from both Republicans and Democrats in North Carolina who say the government should not be separating migrant children from their families at the border.

Phil Roeder / Flickr

Updated 6:01 p.m.
The U.S. Supreme Court issued rulings Monday in two gerrymandering cases, from Wisconsin and Maryland, that are being closely watched in North Carolina. But the rulings don't touch on the key issue, whether it's legal to redraw districts to give an unfair advantage to a political party.

Oliver Merino

Latino voter turnout in Mecklenburg County spiked during the May primary, according to elections data. Experts and organizations are attributing the increase to the Sheriff's race and local immigration policies. Now, election observers are wondering if the momentum will continue into the general election.

Electric utility vehicles
David Boraks / WFAE

A proposal working its way through the Charlotte City Council takes aim at climate change, by setting a goal of converting city buildings and vehicles to clean energy within 12 years. The city also wants to encourage residents and businesses to adopt more environmentally friendly practices.

A bill addressing opioid abuse by creating new crimes against medical workers and granting certain police investigators easier access to prescription records awaits Governor Roy Cooper’s signature. The Senate quickly approved the measure, known as the HOPE Act, 41-3 Thursday.

I-77 MOBILITY PARTNERS

Updated 11:40 p.m.
North Carolina lawmakers will have to iron out their differences on how to pay for a buyout or changes to the NCDOT's controversial contract for toll lanes on I-77 near Charlotte. That's after the House late Thursday failed to concur on Senate changes to a House transportation bill. 

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