Jeff Tiberii

WUNC Greensboro Bureau Chief

Jeff Tiberii first started posing questions to strangers after dinner at La Cantina Italiana, in Massachusetts, when he was two-years-old. Jeff grew up in Wayland, Ma., an avid fan of the Boston Celtics, and took summer vacations to Acadia National Park (in Maine) with his family.  He graduated from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism, and moved to North Carolina in 2006. His experience with NPR member stations WAER (Syracuse), WFDD (Winston-Salem) and now  WUNC, dates back 12 years. 

He works in the Capitol Bureau in downtown Raleigh. Jeff started at WUNC as the Greensboro Bureau Chief, in September of 2011. He has reported on a range of topics, including higher education, the military, federal courts, politics, coal ash, aviation, craft beer, opiate addiction and college athletics.

His work has been heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here & Now. Jeff’s work has been recognized with four regional Edward R. Murrow Awards, and dozens of other honors. He loves to travel and would one day like to live and work abroad.

If you have a story, question or thought find him at JTiberii@WUNC.org or @J_tibs


State lawmakers have returned home following a hectic, six-week session during which they approved a state spending plan, continued an ongoing clash with the Governor, and for the most part, avoided any major controversy.

Duane Hall stands behind a large wooden desk on the second floor of his law office in downtown Raleigh. The Governor’s Mansion is visible out the window. That’s where Hall used to shoot baskets with his friend, Governor Roy Cooper, and where he proposed to his now fiancé last December. It doesn’t feel so close anymore. These days Representative Hall is, perhaps, the loneliest man in North Carolina politics.

(Updated at 2:15 p.m.) A state lawmaker accused of sexual harassment says he will not resign from his seat, despite calls from leading members of his party to step down.

In July 2013, North Carolina lawmakers passed the Voter Information Verification Act – known more commonly as voter ID.  It’s a controversial law that was ultimately struck down in federal court for being unconstitutional. Nearly four years later, state legislators are now working on another voter ID bill that would be taken to voters as a constitutional amendment, according to sources.

HB2's Impact: Politics

Mar 24, 2017

One year ago, House Bill 2 moved through the General Assembly and was signed into law by Governor Pat McCrory. A frenzied political day amplified partisan bickering, triggered unintended consequences, and established a divisive law that remains on the books.


A three-judge panel in North Carolina has issued a temporary restraining order blocking a law that strips the state's new governor of some powers.

The law was signed by outgoing Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and requires state Senate approval for Cabinet nominees of the new Democratic administration, something that was not required for McCrory's own nominees.

The Republican-controlled state Legislature passed the measure after McCrory lost November's election to Democrat Roy Cooper. Democrats called it a "power grab."

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No Repeal of House Bill 2

Dec 21, 2016
North Carolina General Assembly

RALEIGH, N.C. — A deal to undo House Bill 2 fell apart Wednesday night when legislators couldn't agree on a plan to the repeal the measure, a sign of the bitter political divide within the state.

After an acrimonious day that led to protests and arrests, lawmakers are likely to give final approval Friday to bills that would remove executive powers.

On Thursday, hundreds of protesters gathered at the N.C. General Assembly to voice their opposition to these Republican policy proposals and chanted in unison, "Shame! Shame! Shame! Shame! Forward together, not one step back!"

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