Arts & Culture

News and information about arts and culture from Charlotte and the Carolinas. 

Kevin Granados

When we think of art exhibits, we certainly don’t think of Homeless outreach centers as venues, but that was the case last month the Urban Ministry Center in Charlotte.

The liveliness of the happy and colorful art on display is matched by the energy of visitors and artists as they roam the Hope is an Open Door exhibit.

“It’s an awesome thing. It’s awesome. I mean, real awesome,” says Annie Gurley.

There are sculptures, paintings, drawings – all the creations of artists who are or have been homeless.

Willie Little Takes On Tea Party, Klan In Exhibition

Sep 22, 2014
T. Ortega Gaines / Charlotte Observer

In 2010, artist Willie Little began a satirical body of work about racism in the tea party movement. 

The Charlotte Symphony Orchestra will be celebrating more than its season-opening concerts this weekend. The Orchestra announced this week it finished the last fiscal year in the black for the first time since 2002. Charlotte Symphony president and CEO Bob Stickler says the Symphony is doing a better job of generating community support after years of relying too much on big donations from institutions like the Arts and Science Council. He spoke to WFAE's Duncan McFadyen.


Kenneth Carr: Back Home For The Sunset Jazz Festival

Sep 12, 2014

It’s been eight years since Charlotte-born jazz musician Kenneth "Kenny" Carr last played before a home crowd.

Not familiar with Carr?

Well, let’s start there.

“Charlotte has a lot of great musicians,” Carr said during a phone chat from his home in West New York, N.J. “However, Charlotte is the type of city where they actually grab other artists from someplace else.

“I can go to Europe, I can go to Budapest, I can go all over the world and people love and embrace me,” he continued. “But you go to Charlotte, you can barely get played on the radio.”

The stories of violins recovered from the Holocaust and the people who played them are the focus of an event this evening at UNC Charlotte. Music professor James Grymes will read from his book, “Violins of Hope.” He was inspired to write the book two years ago when the violins were part of an exhibit on campus.  That exhibit marked the first time the violins were on display in the U.S. His research included a visit to the Israeli violinmaker who restored the violins.


Pigs Race For Oreos At Cabarrus County Fair

Sep 8, 2014
Tasnim Shamma

More than 80,000 visitors are expected to visit the Cabarrus County Fair this week. It's been an attraction in the county for more than 60 years. 

Leann Rimes Takes Pride In Perseverance

Aug 15, 2014

Singer Leann Rimes exploded onto the country music scene in 1996 at the age of 13 with the hit "Blue." Now  31, she’s had 13 No. 1 singles, won two Grammy awards, and has sold millions of albums. Her latest album is called Spitfire, and she is the star of a reality show on VH1 with her husband called Leann and Eddie. She performs this Sunday at the Charlotte Pride Festival, and spoke to WFAE Morning Edition host Kevin Kniestedt.


Courtesy of Brendan O'Connell

Imagine you’re walking through your neighborhood Walmart and somewhere between the pet supplies and check-out lines, you run across a 40-something guy with a painting easel that's propped up on a shopping cart. That was the scene in Charlotte this week at the Walmart on Wilkinson Boulevard. Contemporary artist Brendan O'Connell, wearing jeans and an un-tucked pinstripe shirt, was hanging out in the produce section. The paint was drying on his rendition of a cluster of bananas.   

O’Connell has been dubbed “Walmart’s Warhol,” he's been on the Colbert Report and he was featured in Time Magazine as “America’s Brand Painter.” WFAE's Mark Rumsey caught up with O’Connell and chatted with him about his Walmart live painting sessions and his vision for everyday art in America today.


Arts And Science Council Cuts CMS Field Trip Program

Jul 29, 2014
Thomas Bus Company

CMS students won’t be going to the museums this year, at least not on the Arts and Science Council’s dime, and a fund-raising shortfall is the culprit.

MATTHEW WAEHNER / N.C. STATE ARCHIVES, DEPARTMENT OF CULTURAL RESOURCES

Sometimes a news story is best told in rhyme…so here goes:

There once was a governor named Pat
Who thought in verse this state should not lack
So he picked a poet
To be our State Laureate
But his pick others found out of whack.
Here’s Duncan McFadyen
To explain what has happened

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