Arts & Culture

News and information about arts and culture from Charlotte and the Carolinas. 

Group Brings People's Stories To Life

Jun 20, 2016
a woman telling story to group of people
Allison Braden / WFAE

It’s a big night for Ruth Russell. She stands at a microphone, in front of a crowd, and she begins to tell a story.

But Ruth’s story really begins two months earlier, when she attended a meeting of the Charlotte Storytellers for the second time. On that rainy Monday in Uptown, she would first tell the story of her journey toward becoming a professional businesswoman. It was a nerve-wracking experience.

Malcolm Graham holds a portrait of his sister, Cynthia Hurd.
Courtesy of Malcolm Graham

For the past year, former Charlotte city councilman and state lawmaker Malcolm Graham has grappled with the loss of his sister, Cynthia Graham Hurd. She was one of the nine shot and killed at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston a year ago. 

Sarah Delia WFAE

The City of Asheville goes by another name, Altamont. That's how it appeared in a book by early twentieth century writer Thomas Wolfe.  He called the place home, but not in an especially fond way. His novel Look Homeward Angel about a young writer trying to break free of his small town and family was largely autobiographical and brought him literary acclaim. A new film which takes place in New York, called Genius, portrays Wolfe and his working relationship with his editor. As Jude Law got ready to fill Wolfe's literary shoes, it wasn't the big city he had to go to fully understand the writer, it was Asheville, and one place in particular there. 

Courtesy of Anthony Hamilton

When artists hit the big time, it’s not uncommon for them to move on to LA or New York. Grammy Award winning singer and Charlotte native Anthony Hamilton is no exception. But he’s learned you can go home again and still have a successful career.

WFAE’s Sarah Delia caught up with Hamilton at his home just outside of Charlotte to talk about his latest album and the changes he’s been through since his last one.

Tom Bullock

Around this time last year a former Goodyear Tire building in Charlotte’s Uptown was entering its final phase: as a creative space for local artists. That project has come to an end, but now its story lives on in another building needing a new breath of life. 

Nick de la Canal

 

It was a big night for high school theater students from around the Charlotte region as the Blumenthal Performing Arts held it's 5th annual Blumey Awards, recognizing achievements in high school theater.

The excitement was palpable as audience members clad in tuxedos and floor-length evening gowns paraded down the aisle to their seats, and orchestra members began tuning their instruments under the watchful eye of music director David Dabbon, who had traveled all the way from New York to direct the show’s musicians.

WFAE Sarah Delia

Since 2001, The Evening Muse has sat on the corner of North Davidson and East 36th Street in the heart NoDa, Charlotte's arts district.

Over the last 15 years the music venue has been a witness to the changes of the neighborhood: the ebb and flow of crime, the fall of other local music establishments, and now the expansion of the light rail and its constant construction.

The owner of the Evening Muse says he's confident the Charlotte staple will last, but not without adapting to the changes of the time. WFAE's Sarah Delia sat down with him and has this story.


David Boraks / WFAE

A speaker critical of Islam ignited a campus debate this spring at Wingate University about free speech and how Muslim students are viewed.

Nick de la Canal

For as far back as 2,000 BC, mothers in the Catawba Indian tribe have been using special techniques to craft unique pieces of hand-made pottery, passing down its traditional methods from generation to generation.

The tradition nearly died out a century ago, when the tribe’s population fell to just over 100 people. But over the last several decades, the Catawba people have reestablished themselves on a reservation near Rock Hill, South Carolina, right off the Catawba river, and that’s led to a revival of the tribe’s pottery-making.

Sarah Delia WFAE

There's a new face in one of Charlotte's oldest neighborhoods.  With the help of three artists, a local festival, and various community members, the image of one of the Queen City's better known drag queens is now part of the Plaza Midwood landscape.


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