Charlotte City Council

Two incumbents and two newcomers won Democratic nominations for Charlotte City Council at-large seats in Tuesday's primary. 

Updated at 9:55 p.m.
With most of the vote counted, two incumbents and two newcomers were leading Tuesday's Democratic primary for Charlotte City Council at-large seats. 

Incumbent James Mitchell (19.4 percent) was leading the race for four slots. Activist and political newcomer Braxton Winston and incumbent Julie Eiselt both had about 17 percent, and current 5th District council member Dimple Ajmera was leading in the race for the fourth slot, with 13.3 percent. Ryan McGill (12.1 percent) and incumbent Claire Fallon (11.2 percent) followed. 

The four nominees will face three Republicans in November. 

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Updated 10:36 p.m.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts conceded victory to Mayor Pro Tem Vi Lyles Tuesday in Charlotte's Democratic mayoral primary. With 98 percent of precincts reporting, Lyles had about 46.2 percent to Roberts's 36.2 percent. Joel Ford was a distant third with about 15.9 percent.

Once the results are certified, Lyles will face Republican Kenny Smith in the general election on Nov. 7. 

Charlotte City Council Members Lawana Mayfield and Ed Driggs are responding to a report that finds Charlotte's need for affordable housing far exceeds the 5,000 units city council has pledged to create in the next three years.

City council was informed by city staff on Monday that at least 34,000 units of affordable housing are needed, especially for low-income residents.

Chris Kizzie of Enterprise Community Advisors (right) and Pamela Wideman of the city's Housing and Neighborhood Services department gave a presentation on affordable housing to the city council Monday.
David Boraks / WFAE

City officials say Charlotte is nearly halfway to a goal set last year of creating 5,000 affordable housing units over three years. But at the Charlotte City Council Monday night, council members, staff and citizens all said it's not enough - especially for those with very low incomes.

Updated 4:33 p.m.
A Charlotte City Council committee voted Thursday to decline Mecklenburg County's offer to transfer ownership of Memorial Stadium to the city for a Major League Soccer stadium. 

Backers of a bid to bring Major League Soccer to Charlotte say they're pushing ahead, despite the county commission's decision this week not to contribute funding for a new stadium near uptown.  A statement sent on behalf of MLS4CLT says:

Supporters of more funding for parks and greenways waved signs at Wednesday's county commission meeting.
David Boraks / WFAE

In a big blow to Charlotte's bid for a Major League Soccer team, the Mecklenburg County Commission voted 5-3 Wednesday night not to help fund a new stadium near uptown. Instead, under a motion put forward by stadium opponents, they voted to fund long-delayed parks projects, and to offer the county-owned Memorial Stadium to the city of Charlotte. 

City of Charlotte Twitter

Carlenia Ivory, a longtime educator, organizer, and community advocate in Charlotte, was sworn in Tuesday as District 2 representative on Charlotte City Council.

Ivory, 66, succeeds Al Austin, who prematurely stepped down this month to take a job with the state Department of Transportation.

Charlotte City Council members will vote Monday night on allowing the sale of beer, wine and mixed drinks on Sundays beginning at 10:00 a.m. Cities and counties across North Carolina have been voting on the issue since Governor Roy Cooper last month signed a bill to modify the state's previous ban on alcohol sales before noon on Sundays.  

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