immigration

House Republican leaders will start the coming week the same way they started last week: facing partywide insurrection over an immigration bill that has been repeatedly sabotaged by President Trump.

This converted schoolhouse still chirps with the sound of children. A volunteer teacher points at her eye and elicits the English word: "¿Cómo se dice 'ojo'?" she asks the group of 6- to 10-year-olds.

They hesitate and look at one another until one of them gets it, and they join in a collective scream: "Eye!"

It feels like a bit of normalcy for this group of Central American children who fled their home countries and are temporarily living in a family shelter in Mexico City.

The cries of children pierce our hearts. Scientists say they're meant to. They move us to love and protect children. This response is healthy; it's human; and it keeps humanity going.

As Dr. Marc Bornstein at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development told The Scientist, "the infant cry and the caregiver response, have developed together to ensure the survival of the species."

The total number of people apprehended for illegally crossing the southern U.S. border has been steadily falling for almost two decades. It's a long-term trend that sociologists, economists and federal officials have been tracking for years.

Border patrol car patroling on border
By Hillebrand Steve, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

At least five children who were separated from their parents at the U.S. southern border have been placed in foster care in South Carolina. In North Carolina, officials who resettle immigrants say they're not aware of any children currently being housed in the state after being separated from their families at the border. But they say the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy is affecting immigrants already here.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

After days of damaging news stories about an administration policy that separated immigrant families at the Southern border, President Trump tried to change the narrative Friday. He spoke up for grieving family members who have lost loved ones at the hands of people in the country illegally.

Kandace Vallejo thought she knew Southwest Key Programs: a big nonprofit based in Austin, Texas. Runs a charter school. Works with youth.

And holds thousands of migrant children in facilities paid for by the U.S. government.

That was news.

A Guatemalan mother and her son who were caught up in the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy along the southern U.S. border have now been reunited, after more than a month apart. The two held an emotional reunion early Friday morning, at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.

The controversy over President Trump's executive order to end the policy of separating migrant families who cross into the U.S. illegally is shifting to the courts.

Wikimedia Commons

The Trump administration is catching heat from both Republicans and Democrats in North Carolina who say the government should not be separating migrant children from their families at the border.

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