Politics

United States Supreme Court chamber
runJMrun / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Supreme Court consideration of a legislative redistricting case (all times local):

11:40 a.m.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker remains confident that GOP-drawn legislative district maps will survive a Supreme Court review.
 

The nation's highest court on Monday said it will hear arguments in the case. Justices also put on hold an earlier ruling requiring that new maps be drawn by November.
 

Facebook / Ralph Norman for Congress, Archie Parnell for Congress

Voters in South Carolina's 5th Congressional District will choose their next representative in a special election on Tuesday. The election was required after President Trump tapped Republican Mick Mulvaney  to become White House Budget Director.

Democrat Roy Cooper was sworn in as governor on January 1. The one constant over that time has been a series of clashes with the Republican controlled General Assembly.

The latest was kicked off by the U.S. Supreme Court, which recently ruled 28 state legislative districts are illegal racial gerrymanders. Those boundaries must be redrawn.

But when is still an open question. The high court left it to a lower federal court to decide that issue.

On Wednesday, Governor Cooper gave an exclusive interview to WFAE. He spoke with our Political Reporter Tom Bullock.

Screen Grab via WRAL

When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that 28 state legislative districts were illegal racial gerrymanders they made one thing clear, North Carolina's political maps must be redrawn. What they didn't say is when. They've kicked that decision back to a lower court.

It also kicked off the latest power struggle between Democratic Governor Roy Cooper and the Republican-controlled General Assembly.

No concealed guns permitted on premise sign
Kevin Kniestedt

On Thursday, the North Carolina House is scheduled to take a final vote on a bill which would all but end the need for concealed-carry permits for handguns. Yesterday, the House gave its tentative approval for the measure but by a slim margin. The bill is controversial and even before debate began yesterday groups both for and against the proposal took to unusual tactics to get their message across.

Grass Roots North Carolina Logo

Wednesday afternoon, the North Carolina House is scheduled to debate a bill which would, in part, nearly end the need for concealed-carry permits for handguns. Ahead of that debate a group supporting the measure saw fit to publicly release the names, phone numbers and other information of four individuals trying to stop the gun bill.

A bill to move up primary elections in North Carolina is one step closer to being passed.

U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis spoke with WFAE this week about health care, immigration and the climate in Washington.
WFAE/UNC-TV

U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis is used to fielding a lot of questions. It goes with the job. But many questions in the last two weeks have concerned his health since he passed out during a road race in Washington, D.C.

"I ran the fastest 2.5 mile race of my life. Unfortunately, it was a 3-mile race," he quips.  

As you can tell, Tillis says he’s fine. He says he just didn’t hydrate properly.

Of course, Tillis still gets asked about President Trump, Russia, health care, and immigration  - all topics he addressed with WFAE’s David Boraks.

The leaders of North Carolina's House of Representatives had hoped to unveil their state budget sometime this week. But hashing out their spending plan is taking a bit longer than expected.

The state's congressional district boundaries have since been redrawn, which has reshaped the 1st and 12th districts.
ncleg.net

For the second time in a seven-day span, the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down an act of North Carolina's General Assembly.

On May 15th, it was the state's voter laws.

On Monday, in a 5-3 decision, the court upheld a ruling that two congressional districts were illegal racial gerrymanders. And this opinion may have implications for other North Carolina cases working their way through the courts.

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