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Good Riddance Vista, Hello Windows 7

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

From Seattle, NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports on how important this is to Microsoft.

WENDY KAUFMAN: Microsoft made its name and stunningly large sums of money as the undisputed king of personal computing. But today, Apple leads in many products and Google leads in searches. Still, operating systems matter. How fast, smoothly and seamlessly they work makes a huge difference. Everyone panned Microsoft's last operating system, Windows Vista, when it was released nearly three years ago. And Microsoft's CEO, Steve Ballmer, seems downright relieved that Windows 7 is going on sale.

STEVE BALLMER: Well, what I like best as CEO of Microsoft is that it's been relatively well received, I would say, during the course of the review process. What do I like best as the user? Simpler, faster, more responsive.

KAUFMAN: Windows 7 was extensively pre-tested. Even Ballmer's teenage son offered his input. Still, many critics have suggested that while solid, the new operating system is little more than what Vista should have been. Microsoft hopes Windows 7 will boost both consumer and corporate sales. And, says Marie Joe Foley, editor of ZDNet's All About Microsoft blog...

MARIE JOE FOLEY: It's really important that Windows 7 is a big, big success for Microsoft, because Windows is basically their key product.

KAUFMAN: Wendy Kaufman, NPR News, Seattle. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by an NPR contractor. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Wendy Kaufman