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Terror Strikes in Manchester

This image shows people running through Manchester Victoria station after an explosion at Manchester Arena. in Manchester England, Monday May 22, 2017. An apparent suicide bomber set off an improvised explosive device that killed over a dozen people at the end of an Ariana Grande concert on Monday, Manchester police said Tuesday May 23, 2017.  The station is very near the arena. (Zach Bruce/PA via AP)
This image shows people running through Manchester Victoria station after an explosion at Manchester Arena. in Manchester England, Monday May 22, 2017. An apparent suicide bomber set off an improvised explosive device that killed over a dozen people at the end of an Ariana Grande concert on Monday, Manchester police said Tuesday May 23, 2017. The station is very near the arena. (Zach Bruce/PA via AP)

With guest host Jessica Yellin.

At least 22 dead after an attack at a concert venue in Britain. An alleged assailant dead in the blast. Britain calling it a ‘terrorist incident.’

A horrifying attack in England at a concert attended by teenage girls, killed more than 22 people leaving scores more injured. Initial reports indicate the attacker detonated a suicide vest outside the arena as people were leaving. British authorities have arrested a 23-year-old, as ISIS claims responsibility and President Trump recommits to the fight against terrorism. This hour On Point, soft targets, ISIS threats, and talking to your children about terror. — Jessica Yellin

Guests

Sewell Chan, international news editor in the London office of The New York Times, focusing on coverage of breaking news in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. ( @sewellchan)

Bruce Hoffman, professor and director of the Center for Security Studies at Georgetown University. ( @hoffman_bruce)

Michael Tabman, retired FBI special agent in charge. ( @MichaelTabman)

Ellen Braaten, child psychologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. Director of the Learning and Emotional Assessment Program at MGH and associate director of the Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds. ( @ellenbraaten)

From The Reading List

BBC: Manchester attack: 22 dead and 59 hurt in suicide bombing — “Twenty-two people have been killed and 59 injured in what Theresa May called an ‘appalling, sickening, terrorist attack’ at Manchester Arena. A lone male suicide attacker set off a homemade bomb in the foyer at 22:33 BST on Monday at the end of a concert by US singer Ariana Grande.”

The Guardian: Theresa May condemns ‘sickening cowardice’ of Manchester attack — “Theresa May has said police believe they know the identity of the Manchester Arena bomber, as she gave a speech outside No 10 condemning the “sickening cowardice” of the perpetrator of the attack that killed 22 people.”

New York Times: Manchester Concert Attack Kills 22; Children Among Dead — “The attack at a Manchester concert venue that left at least 22 people dead was almost certainly carried out by one person, the chief of the Manchester police said Tuesday morning, in a bombing that shocked the country and underlined the continued threat to European security.”

Terror Strikes in Manchester

How To Talk With Kids After Bombing At Ariana Grande Concert

Today on our air, Dr. Ellen Braaten shared her advice for parents talking to their children about what happened in Manchester: Reassure the child that life is good, that you and they are safe. Consistency is important for a child of any age — keeping your routines the same, keeping life feeling like it’s normal. And do more listening than talking.

Here are highlights from the conversation, lightly edited.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.