© 2021 WFAE
90.7 Charlotte 93.7 Southern Pines 90.3 Hickory 106.1 Laurinburg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Crime & Justice

Family To See More Recordings Of Andrew Brown Jr. Shooting

andrew brown funeral mccammon.JPG
Sarah McCammon
/
NPR
Attorney Ben Crump speaks at the funeral of Andrew Brown Jr. on May 3 in Elizabeth City.

The family of Andrew Brown Jr., who was fatally shot by sheriff's deputies in Pasquotank County, is expected to view more than 18 minutes of body camera video of the encounter on Tuesday.

The recordings will be shown to Brown's relatives at 3 p.m., according to county officials. Family attorney Chantel Cherry-Lassiter said a news conference will likely follow.

Brown was behind the wheel of his car and outside his house in Elizabeth City when he was shot on April 21. Deputies working on a regional drug task force were serving a drug-related search warrant at the time.

A prosecutor has said Brown’s car made “contact” with law enforcement officers before the shooting began. But Brown’s family and their attorneys have said Brown was driving away and died from an unjustified “execution."

The office of Pasquotank County Sheriff Tommy Wooten II scheduled the Tuesday viewing following a judge's ruling on Thursday that said the family could view some of the recordings within 10 days.

"Because we’re continuing to be as transparent as we can under state law, we will be allowing the family members identified in the judge’s order to view the specified videos much sooner than the judge’s deadline requires," the sheriff's office said in a statement on Friday.

Judge Jeffery Foster ruled that the family can view less than 20 minutes of the nearly two hours of video that was recorded.

“The portions of the videos withheld are found to not contain images of the deceased, and thus are not appropriate for disclosure at this time,” Foster wrote in his ruling.

Foster has said that he would not publicly release the recordings, because doing so could jeopardize the ongoing investigation into Brown’s death or threaten the safety of people they show.

Foster said the video must remain out of public view for at least 30 days, but he would consider releasing it after that point if investigations are complete.

Family members have so far only been allowed to view a 20-second clip from a single body camera. They say it shows Brown was trying to drive away when he was shot.

Brown’s shooting has drawn national attention to the small, majority Black city in the state’s rural northeastern corner. And many city residents — as well as nationally prominent civil rights leaders and attorneys — are demanding the public release of the complete recordings.

Want to read all of WFAE’s best news each day? Sign up here for The Frequency, WFAE’s daily email newsletter, to have our top stories delivered straight to your inbox.