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Elaine Korry

Elaine Korry

Elaine Korry is an NPR contributor based in San Francisco. From August 2004-June 2007 she worked as an NPR senior reporter covering social policy for NPR, with a focus on education, and on the lives of the nation's most vulnerable citizens — the homeless, those living in poverty, working in low wage positions, and trying to find their way to a more stable life.

In 2007, she reported on hospitals struggling to serve chronically homeless people in Los Angeles; the debate over pulling welfare mothers out of school in favor of low-wage jobs; working families with children driven from San Francisco because of the spiraling cost of housing; and proposed budget cuts to literacy programs for immigrant families.

Prior to covering social policy issues, Elaine covered business and economics for NPR for 14 years. She has been awarded numerous reporting fellowships in social policy and education from the Hechinger Institute, Casey Journalism Center, and Wharton School of Business. She attended Rider University in New Jersey, and worked in public radio for 10 years prior to coming to NPR.

  • For thousands of nervous parents, a popular college guide listing little-known, but highly-regarded, campuses has attracted a cult following. The Evergreen State College outside Olympia, Wash., is one of the schools listed in Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools You Should Know About Even If You're Not a Straight-A Student.
  • The Bush administration proposes two new types of savings accounts with higher contribution limits than current IRAs. The White House says the plan will help Americans save more, but critics say the plan is just a tax shelter for the rich. NPR's Elaine Korry reports.
  • The nation's biggest public pension fund agrees to pay a record $250 million to settle age-discrimination claims. The case involves 1,700 California public safety workers who were disabled in the line of duty. NPR's Elaine Korry reports.
  • Microsoft's announcement that it will begin paying cash dividends to shareholders receives a lukewarm response from other technology companies, which face increasing pressure to follow Microsoft's lead. NPR's Elaine Korry reports.
  • Californians brace for another blast from El Nino. The weather pattern battered the coast in recent days, and after a two-day lull, more heavy wind and rain are expected. That means flooding, mudslides and power outages. NPR's Elaine Korry reports.
  • The federal government imposes a modest increase in fuel economy standards for sport utility vehicles and small trucks, beginning with the 2005 model year. Fuel efficiency for the popular models is now expected to rise about 1.5 miles per gallon by 2007. NPR's Elaine Korry reports.
  • United Airlines files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. The filing is the largest in the airline industry. United says it's "business as usual" for customers. But some United workers stand to lose thousands of dollars from the company's employee stock ownership plan. Hear NPR's Cheryl Corley and Elaine Korry.
  • Some United Airlines workers are losing tens of thousands of dollars from the company's employee stock ownership plan. Now, United's financial woes are dragging stock values into the ground. NPR's Elaine Korry reports.
  • Retailers welcome the tentative labor agreement between union dockworkers and West Coast ports. But some merchants worry there is not enough time to properly stock shelves for the holiday shopping season. NPR's Elaine Korry reports.
  • Vocational education programs such as shop and auto repair have disappeared from school offerings in recent years. But Ukiah High School north of San Francisco still has a wood shop, allowing students to experiment with hand tools and learn basic skills. NPR's Elaine Korry reports.