Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

Updated at 9:23 a.m. ET

An anti-corruption court on Monday sentenced former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif to seven years in prison in a case centered on his ownership of a steel mill. It is the latest blow against Sharif, a dogged survivor of Pakistan's brutal political system.

James Comey, the former head of the FBI who was fired by President Trump, says he will push back on a subpoena to appear in a closed-door session before the House Judiciary Committee unless he is allowed to testify publicly.

The committee, which has also issued a subpoena to former Attorney General Loretta Lynch, is looking into how the FBI handled the investigation of Hillary Clinton's emails.

North Korea says it will deport a U.S. citizen who entered the country illegally from neighboring China last month — a move seen as a conciliatory gesture aimed at maintaining ties with Washington.

North Korea's official KCNA news agency identified the American as Bruce Byron Lowrance and said that he had told his captors that he was controlled by the CIA.

The last two surviving leaders of Cambodia's brutal Khmer Rouge regime of the 1970s were found guilty Friday by an international tribunal on charges of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes.

The conviction of Nuon Chea, 92, the chief lieutenant of the regime's infamous leader, Pol Pot, and Khieu Samphan, 87, the former head of state, is the first official acknowledgement that at least some of the estimated 2 million people who died at the hands of the Khmer Rouge from 1975 to 1979 were victims of an orchestrated genocide.

A 33-year-old Colorado man pleaded guilty to killing his wife and two young daughters on Tuesday in a deal with authorities that allows him to escape the death penalty.

In the high-profile case, Christopher Watts entered the plea in Weld County District Court on Tuesday, his voice shaking as he spoke the words "guilty" nine times in response to the various counts.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

The U.S. has officially imposed what the Trump administration calls the "toughest ever" sanctions on Iran, meant to curb Tehran's nuclear and missile programs and contain its growing influence in the Middle East. The sanctions are essentially the same ones lifted by the nuclear deal reached during the Obama administration. However, the U.S. quickly exempted several of the world's largest economies, including China, Japan and India.

Updated at 8:20 a.m. ET

Just two days before facing Democrat Stacey Abrams in a closely watched race to be Georgia's next governor, the state's sitting Secretary of State Brian Kemp — who is also the Republican candidate — says his office has opened an investigation and also asked the FBI "to investigate potential cyber crimes committed by the Democratic Party of Georgia."

Updated at 3:10 a.m. ET

Brazilian far-right politician Jair Bolsonaro — a retired army captain who has expressed admiration for dictatorship; repeatedly denigrated women, minorities and LGBT people; and decried "fake news" — has become the country's new president.

With nearly all the ballot counted, Bolsonaro leads his opponent, Fernando Haddad, by a comfortable margin. The country's biggest news channel, Globo, already has called the election for Bolsonaro.

Updated at 7:15 a.m. ET

An Indonesian airliner carrying 189 passengers and crew has crashed into the Java Sea minutes after takeoff from Jakarta. The Indonesian Ministry of Transportation confirms it has found the wreckage of the Lion Air jet — a Boeing 737 Max 8 that was delivered to the company in August.

All F-35 fighter jets deployed to the U.S. and its allies have been temporarily grounded following a crash of one of the aircraft in South Carolina last month.

In a statement, the F-35 Joint Program Office said the U.S. and its international partners had suspended flights of the Joint Strike Fighter, also known as the Lightening II, until a fleet-wide inspection of the aircraft's fuel tubes is completed.

Updated at 4:07 a.m. ET Saturday

At least 384 people were killed and at least 540 injured Friday after powerful earthquakes struck along the western coast of the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, triggering a tsunami that caused "extensive" damage.

"When the [tsunami] threat arose yesterday, people were still doing their activities on the beach and did not immediately run and they became victims," Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, spokesman for BNPB, Indonesia's disaster response agency, told reporters in Jakarta, Reuters reported.

Dutch authorities have arrested seven men they believe were plotting to carry out a major terrorist attack against "a large event in the Netherlands."

Heavily armed police arrested the suspects in Arnhem, about 60 miles south of the capital, Amsterdam, and Weert, near the Dutch border with Germany and Belgium, the Netherlands Public Prosecution Service said in a statement.

Canada's House of Commons voted unanimously Thursday to revoke honorary citizenship for Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi following her failure to halt atrocities against the Southeast Asian country's Rohingya minority.

The vote to strip Suu Kyi of the honor bestowed more than a decade ago came days after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau suggested it might be reconsidered.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

The American Bar Association said the Senate should not hold a confirmation vote on Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court until the FBI investigated sexual assault allegations against him that were made by Christine Blasey Ford and other women.

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET

Thanks in part to a flotilla of local boats, all 47 people aboard a Boeing 737 are safe after a crash-landing in a lagoon at the Pacific island of Chuuk.

The Air Niugini plane was on approach to the airport at the island, part of the Federated States of Micronesia, when it apparently fell short of the runway.

India's Supreme Court has struck down a colonial-era law that made adultery illegal, calling it arbitrary and saying it is unconstitutional because it "treats a husband as the master."

Section 497 of the Indian Penal Code makes it a crime for a man to have intercourse with another man's wife "without the consent or connivance of that man."

Pyotr Verzilov, a member of the Russian protest band Pussy Riot who fell seriously ill in Moscow two weeks ago, says he believes he was poisoned by agents working for the Kremlin.

Verzilov, speaking in an interview with the BBC after being released from a hospital in Berlin on Wednesday, blamed Russia's military intelligence service, the GRU, saying: "The poisoning was carried out so professionally that no other conclusion is possible."

The chairman of the Australian Broadcasting Corporation has stepped down amid allegations that he ordered the firing of journalists deemed too critical of the government.

Justin Milne resigned his post as the head of the independent, government-funded network after "his board turned against him and staff threatened to walk off the job," The Sydney Morning Herald reports.

A British-based investigative group says that one of two men charged with attempted murder in the nerve-agent poisoning of Sergei Skripal and his daughter earlier this year is a highly decorated officer in Russia's military intelligence service.

Federal and state authorities in Mexico have disarmed the entire police force in the city of Acapulco as investigators look into suspicions that it has been infiltrated by drug gangs.

According to The Associated Press, officers "were stripped of their guns, radios and bullet-proof vests and taken for background checks. Law enforcement duties in the seaside city of 800,000 will be taken over by soldiers, marines and state police."

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