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(SOUNDBITE OF YOUTUBE VIDEO, "HAMILTON MASK-UP PARODY MEDLEY")

THE HOLDERNESS FAMILY: (Rapping) I am not throwing away this mask.

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Vivian Garcia Leonard studied to become a pharmacist in Cuba before coming to the U.S. in 1961.

Her daughter, also named Vivian, eventually followed in her mother's footsteps. So, too, did her daughter, Marissa Sofia Ochs. Today, the three generations of pharmacists live near each other and work in New York City.

But recently, the elder Vivian, who's 82, stopped working to limit her exposure to the virus.

In a remote StoryCorps conversation recorded last month, the women talked about living through the coronavirus pandemic.

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OK. So that was in Texas, but cases are also surging in other states, including California. California's Democratic governor, Gavin Newsom, said 19 counties will have to partially shut down again. Here he is.

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When Christian Picciolini was a neo-Nazi, he heard the term "white power" all the time. It was the term neo-Nazis used as a greeting, as a pejorative, to instill fear, even to sign off letters in lieu of "sincerely."

"It was also a proclamation that distilled what we believed in into two words," Picciolini — who is now an author and founder of the Free Radicals Project, a group that works to prevent extremism — told NPR's Morning Edition.

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As COVID-19 continues to sweep the nation, Latinx people are among those who are being hit the hardest.

"I would equate what we've seen with the Latino population as kind of the perfect storm," said Dr. Joseph Betancourt, the vice president and chief equity and inclusion officer at Massachusetts General Hospital, in an interview with NPR's Morning Edition.

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Good morning. I'm Noel King. A teenager got clever with tech to help people follow health guidelines. Fifteen-year-old Max Melia invented a watch that warns users when they're about to touch their faces with this sound.

(SOUNDBITE OF DEVICE BEEPING)

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