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Scenes from the rare 'ring of fire' eclipse

The "ring of fire" effect caused during the annular eclipse of the Sun over Albuquerque, N.M., on Oct. 14, 2023.
Patrick Fallon
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AFP via Getty Images
The "ring of fire" effect caused during the annular eclipse of the Sun over Albuquerque, N.M., on Oct. 14, 2023.

Updated October 14, 2023 at 8:53 PM ET

Crowds of spectators gawped and cheered as they witnessed the "ring of fire" eclipse pass over parts of the U.S. on Saturday.

The rare spectacle bathed millions of Americans in a lunar shadow as the moon moved between the Earth and the sun.

The annular solar eclipse, as the phenomenon is known, projected a halo of sunlight across skies in Oregon, California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas, though cloudy skies in Oregon obscured the view for some. Other areas caught a partial eclipse.

Jonathan Quirarte watched the event from Phil Hardberger Park in San Antonio, reported Texas Public Radio's Jia Chen. He wore a welder's mask to protect his eyes from eclipse-gazing.

"It's kind of a spiritual thing," he said. "I'm not a very spiritual person but these kinds of things really move me. I find it really beautiful."

In southern Utah, eclipse seekers hit the trail in Bryce Canyon National Park before sunrise to stake out their viewing spot. John Edwards, a cancer drug developer, made a cross-country solo trip to catch the eclipse from the park, reported The Associated Press.

"I just think it's one of those things that unites us all," Edwards told the news outlet. "I just think it's seeing these unique experiences that come rarely is what got me here. This is about as rare as it gets."

The next "ring of fire" event won't happen in the U.S. until 2039, NASA says.

But don't toss your solar-filtered "eclipse glasses" just yet — a total solar eclipse will occur on April 8, 2024, when the moon will completely block the sun.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The moon begins its descent below the sun's horizon during an annular solar eclipse on October 14, 2023 in Kerrville, Texas.
Brandon Bell / Getty Images
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Getty Images
The moon begins its descent below the sun's horizon during an annular solar eclipse on October 14, 2023 in Kerrville, Texas.
The Houston Astros' Dixon Machado wears protective glasses to view the solar eclipse during baseball practice in Houston on Saturday.
Tony Gutierrez / AP
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AP
The Houston Astros' Dixon Machado wears protective glasses to view the solar eclipse during baseball practice in Houston on Saturday.
People watch a rare "ring of fire" solar eclipse along the Las Vegas Strip, on Saturday.
John Locher / AP
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AP
People watch a rare "ring of fire" solar eclipse along the Las Vegas Strip, on Saturday.
Diners and restaurant workers along the Riverwalk in San Antonio, Texas, use special glasses to keep watch as the moon moves in front of the sun on Saturday.
Eric Gay / AP
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AP
Diners and restaurant workers along the Riverwalk in San Antonio, Texas, use special glasses to keep watch as the moon moves in front of the sun on Saturday.
Samia Harboe, her son Logan and her friend's son wear eclipse glasses during totality of the annular solar eclipse in Eugene, Ore., on Saturday.
Claire Rush / AP
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AP
Samia Harboe, her son Logan and her friend's son wear eclipse glasses during totality of the annular solar eclipse in Eugene, Ore., on Saturday.
A partial solar eclipse is seen on a telescope on Saturday in Marietta, Ga.
Mike Stewart / AP
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AP
A partial solar eclipse is seen on a telescope on Saturday in Marietta, Ga.
Tyler Reddick, driver of the #45 Jordan Brand Toyota, wears solar filtered glasses to view the "ring of fire" solar eclipse during practice for the NASCAR Cup Series South Point 400 at Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas.
Sean Gardner / Getty Images
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Getty Images
Tyler Reddick, driver of the #45 Jordan Brand Toyota, wears solar filtered glasses to view the "ring of fire" solar eclipse during practice for the NASCAR Cup Series South Point 400 at Las Vegas Motor Speedway in Las Vegas.
A group of people walk up a ridge at sunrise to find a spot to view the annular solar eclipse that began shortly after 9 a.m. on Saturday in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah.
George Frey / Getty Images
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Getty Images
A group of people walk up a ridge at sunrise to find a spot to view the annular solar eclipse that began shortly after 9 a.m. on Saturday in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah.
The Flores family watches the annular solar eclipse in Kerrville, Texas, on Saturday.
Brandon Bell / Getty Images
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Getty Images
The Flores family watches the annular solar eclipse in Kerrville, Texas, on Saturday.