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After the midterms, can North Carolina still be considered a 'purple' state?

Cheri Beasley
Cheri Beasley
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Cheri Beasley speaks at an event in October 2021.

Many political pundits expected the midterm elections to result in a Republican “red wave” — it’s typical for the party in power, currently Democrats, to lose seats in Congress during the midterms. But nationally, the wave turned out to be just a trickle as Republicans narrowly gained control of the U.S. House and Democrats maintained their hold on the U.S. Senate.

North Carolina, however, saw significant Republican gains. Ted Budd won the U.S. Senate race, both state Supreme Court seats that were up for grabs went to Republicans, and the party won a supermajority in the N.C. Senate and nearly won a veto-proof majority in the N.C. House.

Some notable wins for Democrats in the state include Jeff Jackson in the 14th Congressional District and Alma Adams in District 12, as well as Wiley Nickel in District 13 and Don Davis in District 1.

North Carolina has widely been considered a “purple” state, where neither party dominates. But at least in terms of the General Assembly, the midterm results suggest North Carolina may be turning a deeper shade of red.

We get the latest on where North Carolina lands on the political spectrum with expert analysts.

GUESTS

Dawn Baumgartner Vaughan, state government and politics reporter for The News & Observer

Michael Bitzer, chair of political science and professor of politics and history at Catawba College

Mac McCorkle, public policy professor at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University

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Jesse Steinmetz is Producer of Charlotte Talks with Mike Collins. Before joining WFAE in 2019, he was an intern at WNPR in Hartford, Connecticut and hosted a show at Eastern Connecticut State University.