2020 Presidential Election

Credit Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

President Donald Trump is running for reelection in 2020, and several Democrats are vying for their party's nomination to face him. As of Feb. 26, 19 Democratic candidates had dropped out of the race and eight remained. They are: U.S. Sens. Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren; U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard; former Vice President Joe Biden; former (New York and South Bend, Indiana) Mayors Mike Bloomberg and Pete Buttigieg; and billionaire executive Tom Steyer.  

The general election is Nov. 3. South Carolina's presidential primary for Democrats is Feb. 29, and North Carolinas primaries are March 3. North Carolina is expected to be a presidential battleground state, and Charlotte is the host city for the 2020 Republican National Convention. 

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The Democratic presidential primary candidates are competing in South Carolina on Saturday, hoping to win over voters in the fourth contest of 2020. Follow NPR's live coverage of the primary, including results and analysis. 

The most recent Democratic debate started out with a question for Sen. Bernie Sanders, but it was a question any Democratic nominee would have to think about.

"We haven't had a national unemployment rate this low for this long in 50 years. Here in South Carolina, the unemployment rate is even lower," said CBS moderator Norah O'Donnell. "How will you convince voters that a Democratic socialist can do better than President Trump with the economy?"

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President Trump has faced scant opposition in the Republican primaries, but he is campaigning all the same. As Democrats hold their contested primaries, the president often turns up.

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As Tuesday's Democratic presidential primary debate came to a close, each of the candidates was asked to name the biggest misconception voters have about them.

A day later, the question was still on the mind of Tom Steyer, the billionaire hedge fund investor who has barnstormed South Carolina, aggressively courting the black vote with a focus on racial justice and climate issues.

Even now, with two early state wins and one virtual tie under its belt, and a chance to pull away from the rest of the presidential primary field on Super Tuesday, the campaign of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has a bit of a chip on its shoulder about the way it says it's covered by the media.

Asked during this week's debate in Charleston, S.C., if he would drop out if he doesn't win the primary there, former Vice President Joe Biden was blunt.

"I will win South Carolina," Biden said.

Asked again after the debate if he could carry on if he doesn't win South Carolina, Biden was equally declarative.

Muslim American advocates and civil rights organizations are condemning comments presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg made defending the practice of surveilling Muslims in New York City when he was mayor.

It's the latest blowback Bloomberg's campaign for president has generated as his long history in the public eye dredges up former positions and remarks.

Vi Lyles and Mike Bloomberg
David Boarks / WFAE

Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles announced her endorsement of Michael Bloomberg as the Democratic presidential candidate for 2020 about two weeks ago -- and immediately began facing some backlash. One of the surprising voices to come out against the support was Lyles' own daughter, Aisha Alexander.

The Trump campaign is opening field offices in swing states targeted directly at attracting black voters, a demographic the president has been aggressively courting in his re-election efforts.

The offices are planned for 15 cities with large African American communities and will be used for campaign events and activities, as well as meet-and-greets with surrogates.

Uptown Charlotte is seen Sept. 20, 2019, from Suttle Avenue.
DASHIELL COLEMAN / WFAE

NPR is repeatedly visiting several cities which will play a big role in the 2020 presidential election. First stop: Charlotte to see where voters are on the issues and on the candidates.

Pueblo, Colo., home to famous chilies, a steel mill and strong union ties, is working to diversify its economy.

In Charlotte, N.C., NASCAR has taken a back seat to financial services as the population booms with immigrants and Northeastern transplants.

Wisconsin is deeply purple and up for grabs — and eyes are on its large cities like Milwaukee this election.

Many of America's communities are changing, and so is how voters decide what matters most to them and whom they want their leaders to be.

The Democrats debated for the 10th time Tuesday night and it was a bit of a mess. There was shouting. There was overtalk. There were lots of attacks.

So what to make of that muddle? Here are four takeaways that emerged as the dust settled.

1. Joe Biden was focused on the win in South Carolina

South Carolina is a must-win for the former vice president after disappointing finishes in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada. He came into the debate with a game plan and executed it the best he could.

Steyer Foundation Mulling SC Investments - After The Primary

Feb 17, 2020
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COLUMBIA, S.C. — Ahead of this month’s crucial South Carolina primary, Kat Taylor — the wife of presidential candidate Tom Steyer — said that the foundation she runs is interested in considering an investment proposal from one of the state’s largest black church congregations. But she said the foundation wouldn’t act on it until after the primary.

Flickr / Eric Hersman

Monday, Feb. 17, 2020

As the Democratic presidential race shifts to Nevada this week, candidates are beginning to face more diverse electorates, including Nevada's sizable Latino population.

Democratic Hopefuls Now Test Strength Among Minority Voters

Feb 16, 2020
Bernie Sanders
Claire Donnelly / WFAE

COLUMBIA, S.C. — For I.S. Leevy Johnson, the Democrats’ search for a challenger to take on President Donald Trump is personal.

Geoffrey Hardee

Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020

The wide-open race for the Democratic presidential nomination is headed for South Carolina. Joe Biden has called the state his firewall after early defeats, but a win there is no longer a sure thing. To check the pulse of the Palmetto State ahead of the Feb. 29 primary, we headed to Winthrop University in Rock Hill.

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Updated on June 4, 2020

NPR and the Associated Press are keeping track of who has the most delegates throughout the primary season. At the Democratic National Convention in July, those delegates will choose a nominee for the party.

After Iowa's debacle, the Democratic presidential nominating contest has moved to New Hampshire.

Follow NPR's coverage for the latest updates and then, when the polls close in the Granite State Tuesday night, live results and analysis.

Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

North Carolina is one of 14 states to hold a presidential primary on the so-called “Super Tuesday.” The ballot also will include primaries for the U.S. House and Senate, the North Carolina General Assembly and various state offices, including governor. And, in Charlotte, there are Democratic primaries for at-large and District 3 county commission seats.

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