Arts & Culture

News and information about arts and culture from Charlotte and the Carolinas. 

The Charlotte Observer

A story from Charlotte made its way through the national news cycle. It wasn’t over politics or global warming, but a Christmas display at SouthPark Mall. The massive traditional Christmas tree Santa usually visits families under was replaced with a glacier which sparked a social media uproar.

The tree is now back and the glacier is history, but there’s one perspective we haven’t heard from, Santa.

Allan Amato

North Carolina native Ben Folds has been in the music business for over 25 years. One of his first claims to fame came in the 90’s with the hit “Brick” which he recorded with his band Ben Folds Five.

Since then Folds has collaborated with legends like William Shatner, been a judge on Sing-Off, and operated the prominent Nashville studio Grand Victor Sound.

McColl Center Celebrates Day Of The Dead

Nov 2, 2015
McColl Center for Art and Innovation

On this day every year, millions of people in Mexico and Central America remember their departed loved ones.  This year, the McColl Center in Charlotte will celebrate the Day of the Dead with the help of one of its artists-in-residence.

McLean family

A new exhibit at the Gaston County Museum of Art and History is guaranteed to send a chill up your spine. Hallowed Ground: How We Remember Our Dead explores how society mourns and memorializes the deceased—and how those rituals have evolved over time. One Gaston County native has a personal connection to the exhibit.


"Peer Pressure" screen shot

Qcitymetro

Consider just how brief a 100-word story is. And consider how tough it is to have something important to say and be limited to a mere 100 words. Ninety nine is too few, and 101 puts you over the limit. There’s nothing extraneous about 100 words. It takes real discipline to be succinct. A scalpel, in fact. Remember the famous quote, “If I’d had more time, I would have written a shorter letter”? There’s truth to it. Paradoxically, shorter is much harder and takes more effort. It’s almost effortless to be long and lazy. Brevity? Now, that’s a remarkable feat.

Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer

Charlotte Observer
 

Love him or hate him, Nicholas Sparks clearly is in the romantic fiction game for the long haul.

Daniel Coston

The Blumenthal Performing Arts Center broke convention last weekend with an “international festival of hip-hop dance theater” that represents the center’s efforts to extend its cultural reach—and Charlotte’s. 

Breakin' Convention Flips The Modern Dance Script

Oct 9, 2015
Paul Hampartsoumain / Charlotteviewpoint

 Charlotte Viewpoint 

No one could possibly have imagined the reverberations when, in 1973 in the rec room of the 1520 Sedgewick Avenue apartment tower in the South Bronx, Clive Campbell—known hereafter as DJ Kool Herc—happened to notice that club-goers preferred the instrumental breaks in the funk, soul and reggae records he was spinning. Eager to tap into that enthusiasm, he soon found a way to keep two records looping to keep the break-beat going and, copping from the tradition of Jamaican dancehall DJ’s toasting over the music they played, began chanting over the beats to the delight of the audience.

Erin Keever

A Charlotte family has made it to the big screen. The Patels, an Indian-American family, are the stars of their own documentary. The film follows the comedic journey of actor Ravi Patel trying to find his future wife. But there’s a catch, his parents are the ones calling all the shots. WFAE’s Sarah Delia met the Patels at their home in Charlotte and has this story.


Sarah Delia

The firebird in front of the Bechtler Museum uptown has a new neighbor. A large outdoor installation took residence this week on the terrace of the Mint Museum next door. WFAE’s Sarah Delia checked out the new work and spoke to the artist behind it.


Gabbi Santander

You’ve probably seen the image before. A Mexican dressed in a traditional white shirt and sarape, a huge sombrero covering his face. He sleeps against a wall, or sometimes a cactus.

Some people have named him Pancho, or Ramón. But often he’s referred to simply as the sleeping Mexican.

Courtesy: Levine Center for the Arts

Kicking off a Levine Center for the Arts media event Monday morning, the president/CEOs of the center’s four member institutions indulged in their own act of self-referential performance art by mimicking the famous star-packed Ellen DeGeneres “selfie” from last year’s Academy Awards. Out came the selfie stick; up went the “say cheese” smiles.

Ron Campbell

Animator Ron Campbell has some impressive names tied to his career: The Jetsons, Scooby Doo, The Rug Rats.

And a certain British group with an affinity for a brightly colored submersible: The Beatles.

Campbell helped animate various Beatles themed projects, like the 1968 film Yellow Submarine. He's retired now, though he still tours the country. Campbell is in Charlotte this weekend at the Charlotte Fine Art Gallery talking about his work and drawing in front of an audience. He spoke with WFAE's Sarah Delia.


Andrew W. K.

The name Andrew W.K. may or may not mean something to you. All of his songs are focused on one thing: The art of partying.

He’ll be in Charlotte tonight at the Neighborhood Theatre to play the energizing songs he’s known for. But besides touring and performing music he made popular in the early 00’s he’s branched into a new realm of advice giving—and people really want to hear what he has to say. WFAE’s Sarah Delia spoke with Andrew W.K. about his new endeavor.


Brenda Tindal

The museum known for documenting Charlotte’s story and its place in the New South is experiencing big changes.

The Levine Museum’s president Emily Zimmern is scheduled to retire in November, and its staff historian of over 15 years, Tom Hanchett, is phasing into retirement.

Now, 34-year-old Brenda Tindal is charged with documenting Charlotte’s past and present—the good and the bad. And as WFAE’s Sarah Delia found, she already has strong ties to the museum and Charlotte. 


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