Donald Trump

Updated at 7:43 am ET

On the eve of Independence Day, President Trump celebrated at the foot of Mount Rushmore National Memorial in Keystone, South Dakota with a fireworks display and an impassioned speech against what he called a "new far-left fascism."

Trump Backs Dan Forest In North Carolina Governor's Race

17 hours ago
ltgov.nc.gov

President Donald Trump has endorsed the Republican who is aiming to deny Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper another term.

Flickr / Mike Maguire

Monday, June 22, 2020

The celebration over the U.S. Supreme Court's DACA ruling might be short-lived. The president said he would renew his push to end the program. But it's not the only move the White House has taken in recent days to continue its campaign of tightening immigration.

Six campaign staffers working on the advance team for President Trump's rally in Tulsa, Okla., have tested positive for COVID-19, the campaign said Saturday. Trump is still attending the rally.

Updated 5:45 p.m. ET

President Trump on Monday extended a freeze on green cards for new immigrants and signed an executive order to suspend new H-1B, L-1, J and other temporary work visas for skilled workers, managers and au pairs through the end of the year.

The goal of the move is to protect 525,000 jobs as part of the White House response to job losses caused by the coronavirus pandemic, said a senior administration official, who spoke to reporters on the condition of anonymity. NPR first reported the impending order on Saturday.

Updated at 7:17 p.m. ET

President Trump has removed Geoffrey Berman, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, from office, ending the tenure of a top Justice Department official whose office has overseen the prosecutions of several of the president's associates.

Attorney General William Barr announced the termination Saturday, less than a day after initially suggesting that Berman was resigning — only to be contradicted by Berman himself.

Updated at 6:33 p.m. ET

With anxieties over the coronavirus and tensions over race looming large, President Trump remains on track to hit the campaign trail Saturday in Tulsa, Okla., as he prepares to rally supporters for the first time since the pandemic took root widely across the country three months ago.

Updated at 7:25 p.m. ET Friday

Facebook and Twitter said Friday that a post shared by President Trump about a "racist baby" has been removed from the platforms following a copyright complaint from one of the children's parents.

Officials at both social media companies confirmed to NPR that the president's video was deleted from the platforms following a request from the rights holder.

The action comes after Twitter on Thursday added a label to the tweet warning that the content contained manipulated media intended to deceive viewers.

Updated at 12:25 p.m. ET

A packed arena, adoring supporters, "Tiny Dancer" so loud on the speakers you have to shout to be heard. In Tulsa, Okla., on Saturday night — for the first time since the coronavirus shut down events in March — President Trump will hold one of his signature rallies. The campaign said demand for tickets has been incredibly high.

But the pandemic isn't over, of course, and the rally has public health experts worried.

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump said Friday that he is rescheduling his first campaign rally in months to a day later so it won’t conflict with the Juneteenth observance of the end of slavery in the United States.

Trump had scheduled the rally — his first since early March — for June 19 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Black leaders said it was offensive for Trump to pick that day and that place, a city that in 1921 was the site of a fiery and orchestrated white-on-black attack.

Updated at 7:29 p.m. ET

The Trump administration on Friday finalized a rule that would remove nondiscrimination protections for LGBTQ people when it comes to health care and health insurance.

Visit Jacksonville

The Republican National Committee has tentatively decided to move much of its political convention to Jacksonville, Florida, while leaving some of the business aspects of the convention in Charlotte, according to a story in the Washington Post.

RNC Votes To Conduct Only Official Convention Business In Charlotte

Jun 4, 2020
Erin Keever / WFAE

RALEIGH — President Donald Trump won't accept his party's nomination in North Carolina, but the Republican National Committee confirmed Thursday that it would still hold meetings in Charlotte.

Spectrum Center

The city of Charlotte said Wednesday that it has spent $14 million to prepare for the Republican National Convention -- an event that may not happen in the city at all.  

Dashiell Coleman / WFAE

The city of Nashville, Tennessee  -- a possible site for a relocated Republican National Convention -- doesn’t plan to pursue all or parts of the event, according to the mayor’s office.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

President Trump defended what he called a "very symbolic" photo-op on Monday in front of St. John's Church and dismissed a suggestion that he needed to do more to comfort the nation after the death of George Floyd, saying that cracking down on violent protests was paramount.

Jennifer Lang / WFAE

President Donald Trump tweeted Tuesday evening that the RNC will be "forced to seek another state to host" the event that is slated to be held in Charlotte's Spectrum Center in August. The GOP, however, clarified that the "celebration of the president's acceptance" of the nomination will take place in another city, but the business side of the convention could remain in Charlotte.

A technology policy nonprofit organization on Tuesday sued President Trump over his executive order attempting to strip away a legal protection long enjoyed by social media platforms.

Trump, Cooper Speak About GOP Convention Details

May 30, 2020
Roy Cooper
NC Department of Safety

RALEIGH — President Donald Trump and North Carolina's governor disagreed on Friday over the viability of a full-fledged Republican National Convention, the governor's office said, as Trump does not want to see signs of the pandemic in his renomination audience.

Updated at 10:56 p.m. ET

Derek Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer involved in George Floyd's death on Monday, has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman announced the charges Friday, shortly after Chauvin was taken into custody by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

The announcement comes days after the release of a video that shows Chauvin's knee pressed firmly on the black man's neck for at least seven minutes.

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