Election

“And so begins a critical period in American politics…that almost no one notices,” is the conclusion of a Brookings Institute report about primary elections in the United States.  A key finding is that in the past three midterms elections, turnout in congressional primaries has averaged 5.4%, 4.6% and 7.5% of the voting age population. 

Twelfth District Candidates Talk Education

Apr 4, 2014
Tasnim Shamma

Four Democrats and one Republican running to represent North Carolina’s 12th Congressional District met Thursday night at the Little Rock A.M.E. Zion Church for a panel hosted by the John S. Leary Association of Black Attorneys.

The theme of the night: how to improve the state and country's educational system.


Tasnim Shamma

The race for the next Mayor of Charlotte will be decided by 11 votes. No the fix is not in for our next election. Only members of the city council will be able to vote for the person who will fill out Patrick Cannon’s term. That vote is expected on Monday.


The North Carolina State Board of Elections presented to lawmakers Wednesday evidence of some voters potentially casting ballots in North Carolina and another state. But the board emphasized that doesn't mean voting fraud occurred.


Tom Bullock/WFAE News

Many of the political ads you see and hear are produced by independent third-party interest groups. They are called “independent” because it’s illegal for these groups and candidates to coordinate their campaigns.

But this year it’s harder to distinguish between these groups and some candidates in North Carolina’s U.S. Senate Race.

This year the campaigns of Thom Tillis and Kay Hagan are pushing the boundaries of election law.


Denise Cross Photography

Last week a federal judge ruled that some North Carolina lawmakers will have to release emails they exchanged with lobbyists as they were working on the state's sweeping new election law. The judge's order addresses a key question in the lawsuits brought by the U.S. Justice Department and others against the state: How far does the concept of legislative immunity go?


Duncan McFadyen

With North Carolina’s primary election just over a month away, six Democrats running to represent the state’s 12th Congressional District met Thursday at a forum in Greensboro. The candidates laid out their positions on a number of issues, but as WFAE’s Duncan McFadyen reports, it’s a challenge to find differences among them.


NC Republican Redistricting Deters Legislative Opponents

Mar 20, 2014

If you don’t like what your elected leaders are doing, you have recourse in the next election. You can kick ’em out of office.

But that’s hardly a reality in 2014 when it comes to the North Carolina General Assembly. More than half of the 170 House and Senate seats will be decided in the May primary because they have no opposition in the general election. So, we are pretty much assured there being no significant changes in the Republicans’ veto-proof majority.

Tom Bullock/WFAE News

In seven weeks, North Carolinians will go to the polls for the state  primary elections.  This means candidates for all kinds of offices are out wooing voters and raising money. For those trying to become elected judges - the process is a bit strange.  And even the candidates worry it may hurt the credibility of the state’s highest courts. 


My previous post looked at what has become one of the key competitive races for a U.S. Senate seat, following the closing of the filing period. But it won’t be just the U.S. Senate seat that will be up for grabs in May and November, but also all 170 seats in the North Carolina General Assembly. Or so one would think.

In looking at the candidate filing and the past voting patterns of the district lines under the new maps, the overall contest for North Carolina’s state legislature really won’t be as competitive as most would expect. 

New leadership and a surprise merger of sorts. No we’re not talking about the latest on Chiquita banana.  In this installment of our Thursday political conversation Morning Edition host Kevin Kniestedt and WFAE's Tom Bullock talk about a week of good and bad news for the North Carolina Democratic Party. 


The eight Republican U.S. Senate candidates who hope to take on Sen. Kay Hagan in the fall can be divided into three tiers.

Typically, we would consider “top tier” candidates who have run and held public office before, meaning they have financial resources, campaign organization, and some name recognition.

Tom Bullock/WFAE News

Later this year North Carolina voters will have a chance to do something rare – elect four of the seven justices on the State Supreme Court.  There will likely be record amounts of money poured into those races.  So much so that some are worried that justice may seem for sale.


Like many other states, registering as a Republican or Democrat in North Carolina isn’t as appealing as it used to be.  The number of unaffiliated voters continues to rise.  They now account for 26 percent of the state’s electorate. 


DavidsonNews.net

A recount at the Mecklenburg Board of Elections Thursday confirmed that Huntersville Mayor Jill Swain was re-elected on Nov. 5, defeating challenger and former Mecklenburg County Commissioner Jim Puckett by a slightly wider margin than shown in election night results.

In the final official tally, Swain had 2,475 to Puckett’s 2,443 – a difference of 32 votes.

Puckett had requested a recount after the unofficial results on Nov. 5 show him losing by just 26 votes – 2,467 to 2,441.

Patrick Cannon Is Charlotte's New Mayor

Nov 6, 2013
Michael Tomsic / WFAE

Charlotte has a new mayor. Democrat Patrick Cannon won 53 percent of the vote last night, defeating Republican Edwin Peacock.


Michael Tomsic

The Charlotte Mecklenburg School board will soon have two new people with the last name of Bailey. Matthews Mayor Pro-Tem Paul Bailey swept district six, which covers southern Mecklenburg county, receiving 60 percent of the vote.  He said voters wanted someone who is a good collaborator. 


Patrick Cannon
City of Charlotte

Thursday’s mayoral debate in Charlotte was largely routine, but one comment in particular has drawn some scrutiny. City councilman and Democratic candidate Patrick Cannon denied involvement in the city’s controversial closed door discussions with the Carolina Panthers earlier this year, but city records tell a different tale.


Ben Bradford / WFAE

Charlotte’s two candidates for mayor met for a debate Thursday at local PBS station WTVI. The city’s Capital Improvement Plan and the building of a streetcar were the most contentious topics, as they have been throughout the campaign.


Forum Draws Differences Among At-Large Candidates

Oct 30, 2013
T. Ortega Gaines / Charlotte Observer

  A forum featuring eight Charlotte City Council candidates Tuesday found little support for a streetcar, grudging support for business incentives and lingering resentment over the state’s effort to transfer control of the airport.

Eight contenders for four at-large seats met for a forum at WTVI sponsored by the League of Women Voters. Taking part were four Democrats, a Libertarian and three of four Republicans. Republican Vanessa Faura did not attend.

Candidates divided over the streetcar, which advocates see as an east-west connector.

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