Election

A recent article in the Charlotte Observer had the headline asking, “Voting fight: Is it race or politics?”

For intensely partisan observers, the redistricting fight is either racial or political. But, in looking deeper into the numbers nowadays, the answer is that the voting fight is much more race and politics. 

Going into the future, however, it could be ‘or’ rather than ‘and’ when it comes to racial politics in North Carolina.

CMS Board Candidate Forum

Oct 25, 2013
Michael Tomsic

A more analytical approach to a massive budget, more input from a neighborhood before closing a school, and a lot more lawmakers in Raleigh who agree with educators in Charlotte.

Those are a few things candidates for the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board called for Thursday night at a public forum hosted by WFAE and MeckEd.

There are 12 candidates running for the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board’s six district seats.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

Five CMS district seats are up for grabs this election.  Current board members say they’ve seen the board through difficult financial times and are eager to forge ahead with a new superintendent. Their challengers say there’s room for improvement.  WFAE together with MeckEd will hold a public forum with eleven of the candidates this Thursday evening. The moderator of the event is WFAE’s Lisa Miller. She joins Morning Edition host Kevin Kniestedt for a preview. 

KK:  So one big difference from the last election is we have a different superintendent. 

Charlotte's Mayoral Choice

Oct 22, 2013

Charlotte's next mayor will be either a long-time Democratic city councilman or a some-time Republican councilman with a long pedigree in Charlotte politics.  WFAE has this look at the city's mayoral choice come November 5.


North Carolina leaders have to lay out some of their arguments Monday for how they'll defend the state's sweeping new voting law from court challenges. Monday is the deadline for the state to file a response to lawsuits brought by the North Carolina NAACP and ACLU.


Michael Bitzer
Michael Bitzer / WFAE

With Washington’s mess garnering the nation’s attention, many voters would like a chance to register their complaints against DC right now. And while they will have to wait until next spring’s primary elections and the general election a year from now, some voters will have their chance to express their votes in the coming weeks.

I say “some” voters because very few voters cast their ballots in odd-year elections, one of which is Charlotte. 

Grant Baldwin Photography

There will be an independent candidate on the ballot for Charlotte City Council’s 4th District this year. The Mecklenburg County Board of Elections yesterday verified activist Michael Zytkow has turned in enough signatures to qualify as an unaffiliated candidate. It’s the first time in at least 15 years that an independent has successfully petitioned his way into the city council race.

Dismal Turnout Expected For Primary Elections

Sep 6, 2013
Denise Cross Photography

Early voting is underway for Charlotte’s electoral primaries—it ends Saturday at 1:00 p.m. Then, polls open at 6:30 a.m. on Tuesday morning and close at 7:30 p.m. in the evening. Local primaries traditionally have dismal turnout. The Mecklenburg County Board of Elections reports that, through Wednesday, about 3,000 people have taken part in early voting, about double the total in 2011, but still less than a tenth of the number in 2012’s presidential primaries.

  


North Carolina’s 2014 U.S. Senate race is starting to shape up as most had expected—one of the closest fought in the nation. And when early punditry call it “a close fight,” voters can usually expect an ugly, knock-down drag out battle.

Michael Bitzer
Michael Bitzer / WFAE

The theme of the recent Republican National Committee’s winter meeting in Charlotte was “Renew, Grow and Win.” But it was more about the party of older, white males trying to learn 2012’s electoral lessons in order to face a changing electorate.

While the national GOP sought ways to revitalize the party, other Republicans were plotting ways of “winning” without really renewing or growing. Instead, they want to change the rules of the game.

At a press conference Thursday morning, Governor-elect Pat McCrory appointed millionaire, conservative activist Art Pope to be his deputy budget director--the governor's top aide on budget issues. Pope is an experienced legislator, but the appointment is likely to be a lightning rod.

Tasnim Shamma

Republicans increased their numbers at the poll by more than 60,000 this year, while the number of Democrats decreased by 53,000. And the four groups with the highest voter turnout in the state were Republicans, African Americans, women and senior citizens. That's according to Democracy North Carolina, a voting rights group that analyzed the voter turnout data released by the State Board of Elections last week. 

www.TimScott.house.gov

South Carolina Congressman Tim Scott will become the first African-American senator from the state. Governor Nikki Haley chose him Monday to replace Senator Jim DeMint, who is resigning to run a conservative think tank. WFAE’s Michael Tomsic was at the announcement in Columbia. Here’s a transcript of his segment with WFAE’s Mark Rumsey:

Scott is the only black Republican in Congress. The decision announced Monday makes him the South's first black Republican senator since Reconstruction and only the fourth black Republican ever in the U.S. Senate. 

He takes over for Jim DeMint, who announced earlier this month he would forgo the remaining four years of this term to take the helm of The Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank. His resignation takes effect Jan. 1. 

How Mecklenburg County responds to complaints about flaws in the 2011 property revaluation is now up to county commissioners. An outside consultant who reviewed the revaluation delivered a final report to the county Friday, and it’s on the agenda for Tuesday’s County Commission meeting.

The 2012 Election: It’s a New North Carolina

Now that the dust has settled in the and we have all (hopefully) survived the general election, some thoughts on the aftermath of the 2012 election.

First, North Carolina is more like Virginia than South Carolina.

Pat McCrory says he’s moving quickly in preparations to take over the governor’s office.  He plans to announce his transition team tomorrow. 

North Carolina will soon have a Republican governor and Republican majorities in the state house and senate. 

At a press conference Wednesday, McCrory said he’ll reach out to leaders of both parties. 

Obama Loss In NC A Blow To Local Democrats

Nov 7, 2012

President Barack Obama was re-elected to a second term last night in race that see-sawed back and forth late into the night. This time four years ago, it was still unclear which way North Carolina had gone in the presidential race. Not so today. Republican Mitt Romney won the state by 96,000 votes – dealing a blow to local Democrats.

Briana Duggan / WFAE

The 9th district congressional seat will remain Republican. Former state Sen. Robert Pittenger defeated Mecklenburg County Commissioner Jennifer Roberts 52 to 46 percent. Pittenger will replace Republican Sue Myrick, who is retiring after 18 years in office.

In his victory speech at the Marriott SouthPark, Pittenger spoke of freedoms under attack, “especially the free enterprise system.”

And he pledged that he will work to that system. from the government.

“The greatest anecdote to poverty is the free enterprise system, not the government.”

The Charlotte Observer

The so-called “Charlotte curse” has been broken.  Former Charlotte Mayor Pat McCrory is now Governor-Elect McCory. He beat Democrat Walter Dalton tonight.  

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