Iran

Commentary: How Countries In Conflict, Like Iran And The U.S., Still Talk To Each Other

Jan 11, 2020
Pixabay

Even countries that have broken ties with each other need to communicate in times of crisis and war.

That includes the U.S. and Iran, which have not had an official way to talk directly to each other since President Jimmy Carter cut off diplomatic and consular relations in April 1980, as part of the Tehran embassy hostage crisis. The link has never been restored.

Updated at 4:21 a.m. ET Saturday

In a "terrible catastrophe," Iran says it mistakenly shot missiles at a Ukrainian civilian jetliner minutes after takeoff on Wednesday. The plane crashed on the outskirts of Tehran, killing 176 people.

"Armed Forces' internal investigation has concluded that regrettably missiles fired due to human error caused the horrific crash of the Ukrainian plane & death of 176 innocent people," President Hassan Rouhani wrote on Twitter early Saturday.

Seeking to justify President Trump's decision to have Iran's top general killed in a drone strike, Trump's allies favor the same adjective to describe the danger that prompted that attack: imminent.

"There is no doubt that there were a series of imminent attacks that were being plotted by (Iranian general) Qassem Soleimani," Secretary of State Mike Pompeo declared Thursday evening on Fox News. "We don't know precisely when, and we don't know precisely where, but it was real."

Updated at 8:36 p.m. ET

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Thursday that evidence suggests an Iranian missile strike brought down the Ukrainian jetliner that plunged from the sky Wednesday outside Tehran.

"We have intelligence from multiple sources, including our allies and our own intelligence. The evidence indicates the plane was shot down by an Iranian surface-to-air missile," Trudeau said during a news conference in Ottawa, one day after all 176 people aboard — including dozens of Canadian passengers — died in the crash.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

Details are still emerging about Iran's ballistic missile attack on Iraqi bases housing American military forces, which set off rampant speculation about a potential U.S. response. But President Trump suggested Wednesday that any U.S. action would be economic, not military.

"Iran appears to be standing down, which is a good thing for all parties concerned — and a very good thing for the world," Trump said.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

President Trump said that Iran appears "to be standing down" after Tuesday night's missile attack in Iraq and that "the American people should be extremely grateful and happy no Americans were harmed."

Trump, in a nationally televised address from the White House, also announced a new round of what he termed "punishing economic sanctions" against the Iranian government. And he called on NATO to become "much more involved in the Middle East process."

Updated at 10:03 p.m. ET

Iran has launched more than a dozen ballistic missiles against U.S. military and coalition forces, targeting at least two military bases in Iraq, the U.S. Defense Department announced late Tuesday.

The strikes on military and coalition personnel at the Ain al-Assad air base in Anbar province and in Irbil — at the center of Iraq's Kurdistan region — began at approximately 5:30 p.m. ET, according to a statement.

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif defended the strike, saying it was an act of "self-defense."

More US Troops From Fort Bragg Deploy To Mideast Amid Tensions With Iran

Jan 4, 2020
@82ndABNDiv / Twitter

FORT BRAGG — Hundreds of U.S. soldiers deployed Saturday from Fort Bragg to Kuwait to serve as reinforcements in the Middle East amid rising tensions following the U.S. killing of a top Iranian general.

Fort Bragg troops
@82ndABNDiv / Twitter

The United States is sending nearly 3,000 more Army troops to the Mideast in the volatile aftermath of the killing of an Iranian general in a strike ordered by President Donald Trump. 

The Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Washington.
Coolcaesar / Wikimedia Commons / Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International

WASHINGTON  — Microsoft said Friday that hackers linked to the Iranian government targeted a U.S. presidential campaign, as well as government officials, media targets and prominent expatriate Iranians.

Updated at 6:36 p.m. ET

President Trump announced Tuesday that he has decided to exit a 2015 multinational agreement in which Iran agreed to limit its production of nuclear weapons material.

"I am announcing today that the United States will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal," Trump said.

He said the U.S. will reimpose economic sanctions that were lifted as part of the U.S. commitments made in the deal.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Earlier this year, we brought you a story about John Kees, a Fort Mill man who is one of more than 80 plaintiffs trying to be included in a $2.6 billion judgment against Iran for its role in the 1983 Marine barracks bombing in Beirut. Kees was 11 when his father, Marion Kees, a Navy medic, was one of 241 U.S. military personnel killed in that explosion. Since the original story aired, Kees’ case has had a big setback.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

It’s been nearly 32 years since 241 U.S. military personnel were killed in a terrorist bomb attack on the Marine Corps barracks at Beirut International Airport. Fifty-eight members of the French military also died that day in a separate explosion.

A U.S. federal court found Iran responsible, and more than $2 billion in Iranian assets have been frozen for years.

It’s been a long court battle for bombing victims and family members to collect any of that money. A resident of Fort Mill whose father died in the Marine barracks explosion recently joined that fight. 

Bill Abbott / Fl

Tuesday, November 18, 2014 

Now in its 47th year, we talk to the founders of the Southern Christmas Show about its economic impact and how it's grown. Then, a conversation with one of the most prolific Iranian writers in the world as well as some local women who are advancing the cause of Middle Eastern women everywhere.