Latest National and International Headlines

President Trump's former lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, is set to appear on Capitol Hill next week to give highly anticipated testimony before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

The hearing was originally scheduled for January but delayed after Cohen cited "threats" from the president and attorney Rudy Giuliani.

Is it an innocent display of jubilation over a war's end or an unacceptable act of sexual aggression?

The context of a kiss is clashing with an evolving emphasis on consent in the #MeToo era.

In an age of information warfare, Russia is going back to basics in a bid to protect its secret information from prying eyes, by telling troops to step away from their smartphones and social media.

On Tuesday, Russia's lower house of parliament passed a bill banning military personnel from posting about themselves or colleagues online. The measure also restricts the general use of smartphones.

Updated at 8:56 p.m. ET

Empire actor Jussie Smollett is being charged with disorderly conduct for allegedly filing a false police report about being attacked on the street, Chicago police said Wednesday.

In April of 2014, Boko Haram kidnapped more than 276 girls who were attending schools in the northeastern region of Chibok, Nigeria. The incident drew international attention to the students' plight and the extremist terrorist group that claimed responsibility for the kidnappings. Photographer Rahima Gambo wanted to know why students were still going to school in the region despite the ongoing possibility of other dangerous attacks from Boko Haram.

When Nazis Took Manhattan

3 hours ago

On the evening of Feb. 20, 1939, the marquee of New York's Madison Square Garden was lit up with the evening's main event: a "Pro American Rally." The organizers had chosen the date in celebration of George Washington's birthday and had procured a 30-foot-tall banner of America's first president for the stage. More than 20,000 men and women streamed inside and took their seats. The view they had was stunning: Washington was hung between American flags — and swastikas.

When Martin Luther King, Jr. was in high school, he won an oratorical contest sponsored by the Negro Elks. He and a beloved teacher were returning home in triumph, riding on a bus, when some white passengers got on. The white bus driver ordered King and his teacher to give up their seats, and cursed them. King wanted to stay seated, but his teacher urged him to obey the law. They had to stand in the aisle for the 90 miles back to Atlanta, Ga.

Talks between U.S. and Chinese trade negotiators continue this week in Washington, after discussions last week in Beijing did not yield a deal. Higher level meetings are slated to begin Thursday and continue through the end of the week.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer will meet with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He to continue the negotations.

On Tuesday, President Trump called the talks "very complex."

"I think the talks are going very well," he told reporters.

Three parliamentarians from Britain's ruling Conservative Party are breaking from the ranks to join the Independent Group, a centrist coalition started on Monday by defectors from the opposition Labour party.

The three lawmakers, who are all women, announced their split from the Conservatives in a letter addressed to Prime Minister Theresa May. They said the party had moved too far to the right, especially in its handling of Brexit.

Teenager Nicholas Sandmann's family is suing The Washington Post, saying it targeted the Covington Catholic High School student and defamed him for political purposes when it reported on a January encounter on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial between Sandmann and Native American activist Nathan Phillips.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously Wednesday that the Constitution's ban on excessive fines applies to state and local governments, thus limiting their ability to use fines to raise revenue.

The court's decision, written by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, was announced by her on her second day back at the court. Ginsburg missed in-person arguments at the court for the first time in her quarter century on the Supreme Court bench after undergoing surgery for lung cancer late last year.

Updated at 5:31 p.m. ET

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

On day three of a hearing meant to get to the bottom of an absentee ballot scheme in the as-yet-undecided U.S. House race in North Carolina's 9th Congressional District, all eyes are on Republican Mark Harris and what he knew and when.

The State Board of Elections' investigation is centered on a political operative, McCrae Dowless, who was hired by Harris to get out the vote in the eastern part of the district, which runs from the outskirts of Charlotte along the southern edge of the state.

Terence Blanchard wrote his first piece of music for a Spike Lee joint nearly 30 years ago. The movie was Mo' Better Blues, which revolves around a brooding jazz trumpeter played by Denzel Washington. Blanchard was on set to ghost those trumpet parts, but at one point, Spike heard him playing a theme at the piano, and asked him to write an accompanying string arrangement.

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