Latest National and International Headlines

The House of Representatives has tried to make one thing clear to former deputy national security adviser Charles Kupperman: the now-withdrawn subpoena for his testimony in the impeachment inquiry is behind them. House lawmakers have moved on.

Or as Doug Letter, lawyer for the Democratic-led House, said in a recent court submission: "The subpoena will not reissue today, tomorrow, or ever."

On Tuesday, an attorney for Kupperman told a federal judge in Washington that the promise is not enough.

After weeks of scrutiny over his work at consulting firm McKinsey & Company, Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg released a list of nine clients that he worked for while employed there.

The U.S. Navy has indefinitely suspended flight training for more than 300 Saudi Arabian students at three Florida bases in the aftermath of the deadly shooting by a Saudi Air Force officer at the Pensacola Naval Air Station last week.

Classroom training will resume this week and flight training for other international students will start again, according to Navy officials who call the restriction a "safety stand-down."

The move affects 140 Saudi trainees at Pensacola Naval Air Station, 35 at nearby Whiting Field, and 128 at Naval Air Station Mayport.

A bill introduced in the House Tuesday aims to block Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos from implementing changes she's seeking in Title IX rules.

In Richmond, the capital of the Confederacy, towering monuments to Confederate leaders stand in the middle of the city. One statue depicts cavalry commander Gen. J.E.B. Stuart sitting upon a muscular horse, striking a heroic pose.

About a mile away, a similar bronze sculpture has been installed; but instead of a Confederate general, it portrays a black man with dreads, wearing a hoodie and Nikes.

President Trump is continuing to put pressure on European governments to repatriate their ISIS fighters, who the Pentagon says are being held in "pop-up prisons" in northeastern Syria.

"Would you like some nice ISIS fighters?" Trump asked French President Emmanuel Macron on the sidelines of last week's NATO leaders meeting in London. "I can give them to you." To which Macron replied, "Let's be serious."

There are plenty of flashpoints for controversy littered among the grand pantheon of four-letter words. Plenty of examples probably come to mind immediately — from the relatively tame ("heck," anyone?) to the kind of graphic profanity that may warrant an uncomfortable call from our ombudsman.

Still, one four-letter word has elicited more heated debate than most among grammarians lately. And it happens to be one that we're free to print right here: they.

In exchange for millions of dollars in bribes, a former top Mexican security official allegedly allowed the Sinaloa cartel to operate with impunity.

That's the accusation in a criminal indictment unsealed Tuesday in Brooklyn. The official, Genaro Garcia Luna, served as the secretary of public security in Mexico from 2006 to 2012. Federal agents arrested Garcia Luna in Dallas on Monday.

Businessman Andrew Yang has qualified for the sixth Democratic primary debate next week.

The upstart entrepreneur and nonprofit executive becomes the seventh — and likely final — candidate to make the Dec. 19 debate cut. He reached the polling threshold after a Quinnipiac University poll was released Tuesday.

Updated at 7:02 p.m. ET

Six people, including one police officer, were killed Tuesday in Jersey City, N.J., during a shooting at a cemetery and in a gunbattle in a local market that lasted for hours.

There were two separate shooting incidents beginning at Bayview Cemetery, where the officer was slain, and then later at a kosher market, where five bodies were found after hours of gunfire.

Local police say the two shooting suspects, both males, and three bystanders were found dead inside the store.

The University of Phoenix is paying a record $191 million to settle a complaint filed by the Federal Trade Commission accusing the for-profit university of using deceptive ads to lure students with the promise of future job opportunities with large companies such as AT&T, Adobe, Twitter, Microsoft and Yahoo.

The settlement includes a plan to cancel $141 million in student debts that are owed to the school by people who enrolled from October 2012 through the end of 2016 – the period in which the FTC says prospective students might have been duped.

A newly released watchdog report on how the FBI carried out the Russia investigation offers something for everyone.

The report, the work of Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz, found that the FBI had ample evidence to open the investigation into the 2016 Trump campaign and its links to Russia. For Democrats, that was long-awaited vindication.

Republicans seized on the report's sharp criticism of the FBI, which suffered from "serious performance failures" as it pursued surveillance warrants against one of Trump's campaign advisers, Carter Page.

A group of female pilots and flight attendants is accusing Frontier Airlines of discriminating against pregnant and nursing women, forcing them to take extended and largely unpaid leave while pregnant, and refusing to accommodate breastfeeding.

Bill Cosby will remain in prison for sexual assault, after the Pennsylvania Superior Court affirmed his conviction for three counts of aggravated indecent assault Tuesday. Cosby is currently serving a sentence of three to 10 years for drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand at his home outside Philadelphia in 2004.

On the Vatican's World Day of Migrants and Refugees, in September, Pope Francis unveiled a sculpture in St. Peter's Square to commemorate the travails and hopes of displaced people through human history.

The arc of partisanship in impeachment, to some extent, matches the increased polarization of politics in America over the last 45 years. It moves from consensus to deadlock.

When the House Judiciary Committee votes on articles of impeachment against President Trump, the vote is expected to be along purely partisan lines — a far cry from the committee impeachment vote against President Richard Nixon in 1974, and different too from the President Bill Clinton's impeachment in 1998.

When Elizabeth Warren arrived in Austin to teach law school at the University of Texas in the 1980s, colleagues say she was nothing close to the unapologetic progressive firebrand voters see today.

"She was quite consistently pro-business," said Calvin Johnson, who taught law school with Warren at the University of Texas. "And I'm sure she would not like to be called 'anti-consumer,' " he added. But, in his view, the future Massachusetts senator was "absolutely anti-consumer" on some positions at the time.

Fatima Martinez knows there's a lot riding on her SAT score.

"My future is at stake," says the Los Angeles high school senior. "The score I will receive will determine which UC schools I get into."

But that may not always be the case.

Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

House Democrats unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday morning, charging him with abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress.

Read the articles of impeachment here.

What is the most urgent undertaking for an artist in 2019? Perhaps it is to find music in the noise oppressing the atmosphere, the (mis)information, static and chaotic emotion permeating people's heads. For example: Billie Eilish, the Los Angeles teenager who, with her 22-year-old brother Finneas, made the most streamed and talked-about album of 2019, was once getting her braces adjusted, listening to the whir of the drill shaving down their edges.

Pages