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Last October, a federal prisoner named Richard Evans noticed a suspicious mass in his neck. He reported the condition to prison officials in Louisiana. Nothing happened.

Evans, 74, is a former doctor who was convicted of conspiracy, fraud and distributing oxycodone and hydrocodone. He received a five-year sentence.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has had a light presence when it comes to the Democratic Republic of Congo's Ebola outbreak. But now that is changing.

Dr. Robert Redfield, the CDC director, tells NPR that he'll be assigning about a dozen health experts to work in the DRC for a year and positioning at least some of them much closer to the epicenter than earlier teams.

North Korea is considering breaking off negotiations with the U.S. and resuming nuclear and missile tests, following last month's summit in Vietnam that ended early and without an agreement, a government official said.

Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui told diplomats and reporters in Pyongyang on Friday that North Korea was disappointed with the outcome of negotiations between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, and that Kim would soon decide whether to end his country's voluntary moratorium on testing missiles and nuclear weapons.

John Paul White is a Tiny Desk veteran two times over: He's performed once as a solo artist and once as half of the decorated and now-defunct Americana duo The Civil Wars. So he was a natural to take the stage for NPR Music's Tiny Desk Family Hour, a nearly four-hour marathon of concerts in miniature, held at Austin's Central Presbyterian Church during SXSW on Tuesday night. The room felt at once packed and cavernous, with White perfectly suited to the setting.

Left: Ga'verri Jones-Collins, Charleston's grandson, 10, sits for a portrait below an air-brush painting of his great grandfather. Right: A comb Carlton and Juanita purchased in South of The Border, South Carolina, while traveling.
Shuran Huang

When you walk into Collin's Barber & Beauty Shop, it feels like home.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

Members of Washington's elite legal community decried the "increasing politicization" of the justice system at a particularly sensitive time: as the special counsel probe of Russian election interference edges toward a conclusion.

Losing weight can be difficult, exhausting and frustrating. With all the poor information and bad messages out there, it's hard to know what really works when it comes to weight loss. NPR's Science Desk is working on stories about overcoming the biological and mental hurdles to losing weight, and we want to hear from you.

How Austin Got Weird

Mar 15, 2019

Austin is a lot more than just the annual stampede of South By Southwest currently enveloping it, which the event has done with ever-increasing intensity since 1987. But how did this city, one that has such an ineffable but palpable personality and spirit, become what it is — for better and worse?

This week in Idaho, some voters are speaking out against a bill that would make it harder for citizens to get issues they care about on the ballot – anything from Medicaid expansion to marijuana.

Twenty-six states allow for voter-driven initiatives but as that process becomes more popular, lawmakers from Maine to Utah and Idaho believe it's time to pull it back.

If you've ever been tempted to make a rude gesture at a police officer, you can rest assured that the Constitution protects your right to do so, a federal appeals court says.

Two afternoons a week, Mikala Tardy walks six blocks from Eastern High School to Payne Elementary School, not far from Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

She signs in at the front desk just after 3:30 p.m. and makes her way to a classroom, where she'll be tutoring second- and third-graders who are full of energy after the school day.

Today, Mikala and three students work through an exercise about communities and the building blocks that create them. They learn how to spell people and playground — two essential components of any community, they decide.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has long been known as a consumer advocate and a critic of big corporations. But she's not the only progressive seeking the right to challenge President Trump in 2020 who is highlighting economic inequality.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, for one, fired up the base with these issues in 2016, after Warren passed on a bid. But this time, she isn't sitting on the sidelines.

Shotzy Harrison grew up not really knowing her dad, James Flavy Coy Brown.

He was in and out of her life. James, who has been treated for multiple mental conditions, spent most of his adult life homeless. Once, Shotzy, now 30, found him living in the woods behind a hotel.

At StoryCorps in 2013, the two had reunited, and he had moved in with her and her two daughters in Winston-Salem, N.C. But her dad's presence was short-lived. and they would lose touch again that same year.

Nowhere else in the House of Representatives is the tension between legislation and investigation more present than on the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, where a bipartisan infrastructure deal could be in the making — even as the Democrats on the committee launch a reinvigorated investigation into the D.C. Trump International Hotel.

The Trump administration's decision to alter the way it punishes nursing homes has resulted in lower fines against many facilities found to have endangered or injured residents.

Federal records show that the average fine dropped to $28,405 under the current administration, down from $41,260 in 2016, President Obama's final year in office.

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Updated at 4:37 a.m. ET

Forty-nine people are dead and at least 20 are seriously injured in what New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern says "can now only be described as a terrorist attack."

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Thursday announced that all remaining U.S. diplomats have left Venezuela "for the time being," as relations between the two countries continue to deteriorate.

"Today, all U.S. diplomats remaining in Venezuela departed the country," he said in a statement, adding that it is "a difficult moment for them."

If you're thinking of attending the Smithsonian Institution's Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C., this year, plan for June 29 and 30.

Those are the new dates for the Smithsonian's annual celebration, which will shrink from 10 days to just two this summer, in part because of the partial government shutdown, according to the festival's director.

Amid calls for Saudi Arabia to cooperate with a U.N.-led investigation into the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the head of the kingdom's Human Rights Commission said on Thursday the accused killers were being brought to justice and reiterated the government's opposition to suggestions for an international probe into the case.

Bandar bin Mohammed Al-Aiban delivered his remarks to the U.N. Human Rights Council in Geneva during a periodic review of the nation's human rights record.

This story is part of American Anthem, a yearlong series on songs that rouse, unite, celebrate and call to action. Find more at NPR.org/Anthem.

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