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Charlotte Lehman could hear the man reading his credit card number out loud from across the Starbucks.

He was speaking to a companion, but his voice carried over the music to where Lehman sat. Surrounded by a dozen or so people, the speaker also divulged his phone number a­­nd home address.

After that, all it took for Lehman to identify him was a quick Google search. She was able to find the man's full name, what he does for a living and his professional website. She even heard him sharing a password.

Mexican archaeologists announced last week that they discovered a trove of more than 200 Maya artifacts beneath the ancient city of Chichén Itzá in Mexico.

The discovery of the Yucatán Peninsula cave – and the artifacts, which appear to date back to 1,000 A.D. – was not the team's original goal, National Geographic Explorer Guillermo de Anda, who helped lead the team, told NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro for Weekend Edition.

An Algerian government plane believed to be returning Algeria's president, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, home from Switzerland has landed at Boufarik military airport, southwest of the capital, Algiers, as demonstrators have turned out to protest his quest for a fifth term in office.

Bouteflika had been receiving medical treatment in Switzerland since Feb. 24. Two days earlier, protests had begun, demanding that the now-82-year-old leader not seek re-election next month.

In the midst of a presidential budget proposal destined to generate controversy for its expected drastic spending cuts, White House senior adviser and first daughter Ivanka Trump wants to have a conversation about increasing the availability and affordability of child care.

NPR has learned that the 2020 White House budget set to be released Monday will call for increased spending on child care and propose an initiative to address shortages.

The Packhorse pub sits in the tiny village of South Stoke in the west of England amid rolling hills dotted with sheep. For more than a century and a half, it played a crucial role in the village and marked milestones in the lives of local families.

Gerard Coles, who was born half a mile from the pub and now brews cider nearby, started coming to the Packhorse when he was 15 and underage, sometimes with his school teacher for lunch.

When Erin Gilmer filled her insulin prescription at a Denver-area Walgreens in January, she paid $8.50. U.S. taxpayers paid another $280.51.

She thinks the price of insulin is too high. "It eats at me to know that taxpayer money is being wasted," says Gilmer, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes while a sophomore at the University of Colorado in 2002.

The diagnosis meant that for the rest of her life she'd require daily insulin shots to stay alive. But the price of that insulin is skyrocketing.

Pakistan's ambassador to the U.S., Asad Khan, says India is hastily and unfairly blaming his country for a Feb. 14 suicide bombing that killed more than 40 Indian security force members in the disputed Kashmir region.

"India pointed the finger at Pakistan within minutes. The Indian government and media went into overdrive, whipping up war hysteria against Pakistan," Khan said recently in Washington.

When high school senior and wrestler Brendan Johnston realized he had to face Jaslynn Gallegos, a high school senior, and Angel Rios, a high school junior, in last month's Colorado state wrestling championship, he knew his shot at a state title was over.

Johnston refused to compete against Rios and Gallegos because they are both girls.

Gallegos went on to place fifth in that tournament, and Rios was fourth — marking the first time girls have placed at a Colorado state wrestling tournament.

The House on Friday approved a sweeping measure that would, among many others things, expand voters' access to the polls. But Senate Republican leaders say that chamber will not take up the bill, calling it a power grab.

In the midst of one of the most extensive power outages in Venezuelan history, the country's opposition leader Juan Guaidó urged his supporters on Saturday to mobilize against the government of President Nicolás Maduro.

"Venezuela, let's go to the streets," Guaidó, who declared himself interim president in January with endorsements from dozens of countries, said in a video on Twitter in response to the massive blackout blanketing most of the nation.

A federal judge decided Friday to expand a class action lawsuit to include thousands more migrant families separated at the border before the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy was announced in 2018.

U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw's ruling vastly increased the number of people potentially eligible for relief under a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union that challenged the legality of the family separations, and banned the practice.

On June 26 of last year, Sabraw ordered the government to reunite the affected families.

Arthur Dubois isn't your typical grandfather. That's because at 72 years old, the Chicago resident is a newly discovered hip-hop artist.

This week, Dubois walked into Haven Studios, a music mentoring program on the South Side of Chicago that supports young aspiring artists.

The owner of Haven Studios, Andre "Add-2" Daniels, said Dubois claimed he was "young at heart." So, Daniels decided to listen to Dubois' music. He was quickly floored.

European Union officials have moved to clarify travel regulations for U.S. citizens, following erroneous reports this week that Americans will soon be required to apply for visas.

As the Democratic Republic of Congo continues to experience a deadly Ebola outbreak, armed assailants attacked an Ebola treatment center in the eastern city of Butembo early Saturday morning. A police officer was killed, according to The Associated Press, and health workers were wounded.

The violence comes less than a week after the center reopened following a previous attack last month that led the aid group Doctors Without Borders to suspend work in parts of the region.

Leonardo da Vinci is long-thought to have made sculptures, but since his death in 1519, no three-dimensional work of art by him has ever been identified. But now, curators in Italy have unveiled what may be the only known sculpture by the artist, inventor and scientist.

In the morning of Feb. 23, many Venezuelans were hopeful that opposition leader Juan Guaidó would lead a convoy of humanitarian aid into Venezuela from Colombia. Venezuela's military was ordered to block the convoy from entering, so citizens surrounded military barracks to plead with soldiers to join the opposition. They hoped the 20-year socialist regime would be forced into submission by the sheer weight of popular will.

It's hard to forecast the influence a work of art may have. Fifty years ago, Mario Puzo wrote a book in his basement after his first two novels had won splendid reviews but sold poorly.

In 1969, The Godfather was published.

Listen up, y'all: Perhaps even Yankees should start saying "y'all."

That's an argument put forth by Catherine Davies, a professor of linguistics at the University of Alabama, in a collection of essays titled Speaking of Alabama: The History, Diversity, Function, and Change of Language (edited by Thomas E. Nunnally). Davies' essay includes a section with the heading "A Southern Improvement to the Pronoun System."

"Well, I would say that Southern English is doing a great job," she says in an interview with Scott Simon on Weekend Edition.

Cancer Leads Athlete To Tough Choice

Mar 9, 2019

BrittLee Bowman had a huge decision to make as she lined up at an elite cyclocross race. Cyclocross is a sport that throws obstacles at you, from sand pits to staircases to knee high barriers. And this one, alongside the Hudson River in Queens, N.Y. was no different.

Bowman pedaled. People cheered. And if you saw her that day... you probably had no idea what she was wrestling with. That decision she had to make: Do I have both my breasts removed?

Update 3/13/2019: This story has been updated throughout to include more context that we believe is of service to readers, specifically information about the state of research into pediatric chronic pain treatment, and about how clinicians monitor the safety of patients undergoing the type of treatment profiled here. After the story was released as a podcast on March 8, Invisibilia received numerous audience comments which the show addressed here.

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