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When Kirstin Herbst found out she was pregnant last winter, she and her fiancé were overjoyed. But when she went to the doctor for her first ultrasound, she found out she was having a miscarriage.

Her doctor prescribed a medication called misoprostol, which helps the miscarriage to pass. But the misoprostol didn't work right away, and Herbst needed to take another dose.

Herbst was optimistic when she became pregnant again this past summer. When she went in for an ultrasound, she learned she was miscarrying again.

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

President Trump says he is willing to declare a national emergency if Democrats don't go along with his demands for $5.7 billion for a border wall.

Trump's campaign for a border wall took him to McAllen, Texas, on Thursday for a visit to a Border Patrol station and a roundtable discussion with local officials, before heading to the Rio Grande.

Days after Christmas, Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner and some of his assistants went rummaging around an out-of-the-way storage room in the office looking for some pieces of furniture. What they stumbled upon was surprising: six boxes stuffed of files connected to the case of activist Mumia Abu-Jamal. More than 30 years ago, he was convicted of killing a police officer in a racially charged case.

Jazmine Barnes, a 7-year-old black girl, was buried this week in Harris County, Texas. She was fatally shot while sitting in the car with her mother and siblings on the morning of Dec. 30.

Initial reports stated that the shooter was a white man. Those reports led to a national outcry that this was a racially motivated attack. Activists and politicians demanded that the shooting be investigated as a hate crime. But in the days since the shooting, deputies in Harris County have charged two black men in relation to the shooting.

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

The last stretch before the start of the 2020 census is upon us.

The once-a-decade, national head count is scheduled to kick off next January. Census workers start in the village of Toksook Bay and other parts of rural Alaska when the ground there is frozen enough for door-to-door visits. Then, beginning in March 2020, the U.S. government's most expansive peacetime operation rolls out to households in the rest of the country.

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The Congolese capital of Kinshasa is reported relatively quiet early Thursday morning as the nation's electoral commission waited until the wee hours to declare opposition leader Felix Tshisekedi the provisional winner of last month's long-delayed presidential election in the Democratic Republic of Congo. But runner-up Martin Fayulu is disputing the results, condemning the election results as "rigged, fabricated and invented," according to the Associated Press.

A federal judge in California dealt utility giant PG&E another setback Wednesday by proposing to restrict the beleaguered company from using unsafe power lines during the 2019 California fire season.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco, who is overseeing the utility after a 2010 gas pipeline explosion, said the company should be required to "remove or trim all trees that could fall onto its power lines" and reinspect its grid.

The utility has two weeks to respond as Judge Alsup set a new hearing for Jan. 30.

The last few weeks have been a roller coaster ride of emotions for a California lottery player who, on Dec. 20, believed himself to be the winner of a $10,000 prize.

In the days leading up to Christmas, the man, who has not been publicly identified by authorities, bought a $30 Scratcher ticket at a local grocery store in his hometown of Vacaville, Calif.

Best case scenario, Vacaville Police Department spokesman, Lt. Chris Polen told NPR, the part-time restaurant worker figured any winnings above the cost would put a little extra cash in his pockets over the holidays.

Just days after announcing that some furloughed staff will be returning to clean up trash-riddled national parks during the government shutdown, the Trump administration is making a similar move at dozens of wildlife refuges around the country.

The plans, which have not been publicly announced, would restaff 38 wildlife refuges around the country for roughly 30 days.

Iran has confirmed media reports that U.S. Navy veteran Michael R. White is being held in an Iranian prison.

"An American Citizen, named Michael White was arrested a while ago in the city of Mashhad," the spokesperson for Iran's Ministry of Foreign Affairs said, according to the Islamic Republic News Agency. "His arrest was communicated early through Interests Section of The Islamic Republic of Iran to the US government."

Updated Jan. 10 at 3:50 p.m. ET

The U.S. government has been operating under a partial shutdown since Dec. 22. The shutdown, driven by a political battle over President Trump's demand that Congress approve funds for a wall along the border with Mexico, is touching the lives of Americans in myriad ways.

In his second week in office, far-right Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has pulled the country out of a U.N. migration pact, fulfilling a pledge he made before taking office.

A transgender woman says she was sexually assaulted in a North Carolina bathroom last month, according to police records.

Jessica Fowler, 31, and Amber Harrell, 38, have both been charged with sexual battery and second-degree kidnapping in connection with the alleged incident on Dec. 9 at a bar in downtown Raleigh.

In a prime-time address from the Oval Office on Tuesday night, President Trump said there is a "growing humanitarian and security crisis at our southern border."

Aid groups agree that what is happening on the border meets the definition of a humanitarian crisis. Thousands of migrants are fleeing Central America to seek asylum in the U.S., a journey that puts many at risk of health problems and human trafficking as well as detainment by U.S. authorities.

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