NC Supreme Court

Brookings Institution / Flickr

Gov. Roy Cooper today appointed Justice Cheri Beasley to serve as chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court, making her the first African-American woman to hold the position.

North Carolina's Supreme Court on Friday declared unconstitutional a law forcing the governor to pick state elections board members from names the political parties select. Judges said the law makes Cooper unable to fulfill his duties to make sure election laws are followed. 

Erik (HASH) Hersman / Flickr

Updated 1:25 p.m.
The U.S. Supreme Court has decided not to hear an appeal seeking to reinstate North Carolina's controversial 2013 overhaul of voting laws, including  voter ID.  The decision lets stand a 2016 appeals court ruling that invalidated the law, saying it targeted African Americans.  Meanwhile, legislative Republicans are vowing to find another way revive an ID requirement for voting. 

In an effort to keep the city's tourism economy competitive, Charlotte City Council is considering major upgrades to the Charlotte Convention Center that would cost taxpayers approximately $100 million.

Screen Grab via YouTube

Arguably the most influential race on your Election Day ballot is between two men you’ve never heard of. Bob Edmunds and Mike Morgan.

Edmunds is a Republican. Morgan a Democrat. And the victor will decide whether liberals take over or conservative hold their majority on North Carolina’s Supreme Court.

Mike Burns / Flickr - bit.ly/14CCwbd

Cyberbullying has been a criminal offense in North Carolina since 2009. But the state supreme court has ruled a key part of the cyberbullying law is unconstitutional. In a unanimous decision last week, the court found it violates the First Amendment by restricting speech.

WFAE's Lisa Worf joins All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey ro discuss.

Courtesy of Matthew Bryant

Eminent domain is one of the most powerful tools of government. It allows officials to force the sale of private property for what’s deemed the public good. On Friday, the North Carolina Supreme Court struck down a 1987 law which, in effect, was a type of eminent domain used in the state to keep the cost of transportation projects down.  WFAE’s Tom Bullock breaks down the ruling with Morning Edition host Marshall Terry.

scales of justice
Scott*/Flickr

On June 7, North Carolina holds a special primary. And nearly all the focus of that primary has been on those running for the U.S. House. But there is another race on that ballot, the only one that is a state wide contest. At stake is control of the North Carolina Supreme Court.

When it comes to eminent domain, North Carolina is one of 13 states that allow its transportation department to effectively control private property that may someday become part of a road. This means that compensation may take years, or in some cases, decades. This power is granted through what’s called the Map Act.

The Supreme Court ruled the 12th (orange) and 1st (yellow) districts were illegal because race played too large a role in their creation.
ncleg.net

North Carolina is awaiting word from the nation’s highest court on whether its election can go forward as planned, or whether lawmakers must redraw congressional districts in less than two weeks. A lower court struck down the state’s 2011 congressional redistricting plan on Friday, and North Carolina is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to put that decision on hold.  WFAE’s Michael Tomsic joined Marshall Terry to sort through all this.

NC Supreme Court Upholds GOP Redistricting Plan (Again)

Dec 18, 2015
The state's congressional district boundaries have since been redrawn, which has reshaped the 1st and 12th districts.
ncleg.net

The North Carolina Supreme Court has again upheld how Republican lawmakers redrew the state’s Congressional and legislative maps. The state’s highest court took a second look at the 2011 redistricting plan because of a U.S. Supreme Court order.

The argument is about whether Republican state lawmakers went too far in packing African-Americans into a few districts. Since they tend to vote Democratic, that meant the GOP had a better shot of winning the remaining districts. 

Redistricting Back Before NC Supreme Court

Aug 31, 2015
Giant Sloth / Flickr

The North Carolina Supreme Court on Monday will once again hear arguments over the state's 2011 redistricting plan. The court had already approved the way state lawmakers redrew the voting districts. But the U.S. Supreme Court is ordering North Carolina to take another look.

The state's congressional district boundaries have since been redrawn, which has reshaped the 1st and 12th districts.
ncleg.net

Four years after state lawmakers redrew North Carolina's legislative districts, it's still unclear whether those districts are constitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court Monday tossed out the North Carolina Supreme Court's ruling in December that upheld the redistricting. The nation's highest court is ordering the state court to reconsider the case in light of a similar Alabama case it recently decided.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that North Carolina courts were wrong to decide that GPS ankle bracelets don't count as searches.

Giant Sloth / Flickr

North Carolina state government has paid about $4 million in private school tuition this year. It’s part of the Opportunity Scholarship program, which has paid up to $4,200 to mostly religious schools on behalf of 1,200 low-income students.

More Voters Get To The End Of The Ballot In 2014

Nov 18, 2014
Mecklenburg County

In addition to electing new federal, state and local lawmakers, North Carolinians voted for 144 new judges, from the state’s Supreme Court down to district courts. Fewer people vote in these lower information, non-partisan, down ballot races—it’s called “roll-off”— but this year more people made it all the way through.

Courtesy of Campaigns

The North Carolina Board of Elections says there will be a recount in a race for State Supreme Court.

Via Youtube

One of the most controversial special interest groups in North Carolina is back. The group is Justice For All NC. They are a conservative political action committee. They have a lot of cash and they very much want to influence your choice for North Carolina’s Supreme Court. 

From the 2014 ballot

There’s an odd thing about this year’s election ballot: In all four races for North Carolina’s Supreme Court, a known conservative candidate is listed first. Their liberal counterparts, second.

The races are officially non-partisan but that name placement may give a significant boost to those at the top.

Campaign finance records show $1.3 million were spent on North Carolina’s sole Supreme Court primary this year.  It’s a dubious state record that raises concerns over the impartiality of justices relying on big dollar donations to keep their seats.

Pages