Richard Burr

US Closes Probes Into 3 Senators Over Their Stock Trades; Burr Investigation Continues

16 hours ago
Richard Burr
Sen. Richard Burr / Facebook

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department has closed investigations into stock trading by Sens. Dianne Feinstein of California, Kelly Loeffler of Georgia and Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma, according to people familiar with notifications sent to the senators. The senators came under scrutiny for transactions made in the weeks before the coronavirus sent markets downhill.

Twitter / @SenatorBurr

Thursday, May 21, 2020

U.S. Sen. Richard Burr of North Carolina is under federal investigation for his dumping of stocks before the pandemic caused the market to crash. Was it insider trading? What about the other lawmakers who also unloaded stocks? The ProPublica reporter who helped break the story weighs in, as well as the author of the law that took aim at Congress' stock activities.

Burr Steps Aside As Intelligence Chair, Citing FBI Probe

May 14, 2020
Richard Burr
Sen. Richard Burr / Facebook

WASHINGTON  — A Republican senator with access to some of the nation's top secrets became further entangled in a deepening FBI investigation as agents examining a well-timed sale of stocks during the coronavirus outbreak showed up at his home with a warrant to search his cellphone.

On The Same Day Sen. Richard Burr Dumped Stock, So Did His Brother-In-Law. Then The Market Crashed.

May 6, 2020
Senator Richard Burr
burr.senate.gov

This story was originally published by ProPublica.

Sen. Richard Burr was not the only member of his family to sell off a significant portion of his stock holdings in February, ahead of the market crash spurred by coronavirus fears. On the same day Burr sold, his brother-in-law also dumped tens of thousands of dollars worth of shares. The market fell by more than 30% in the subsequent month.

Sen. Richard Burr's sale of up to $1.7 million in stocks shortly before the recent market crash was one of the lawmaker's only market-beating trades since record keeping began eight years ago, according to a new study.

The new analysis, presented by researchers at Dartmouth College, shows just how unusual the North Carolina senator's transactions were. On a single day, Feb. 13 of this year, Burr unloaded a significant portion of his net worth — a departure from his typically low-volume trading history.

Sen. Burr Sold D.C. Townhouse To Donor At A Rich Price

Apr 14, 2020
U.S. Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C.
NC Farm Bureau

The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Richard Burr, has come under fire in recent weeks for unloading stock holdings right before the market crashed on fears of coronavirus and for a timely sale of shares in an obscure Dutch fertilizer company.

FBI Reaches Out To Sen. Burr Over Stock Sales Tied To Virus

Mar 30, 2020
U.S. Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C.
NC Farm Bureau

WASHINGTON — The FBI has reached out to Sen. Richard Burr about his sale of stocks before the coronavirus caused markets to plummet, a person familiar with the matter said Monday.

Thom Tillis tweeted Friday morning that his colleague, fellow Republican Sen. Richard Burr, “owes North Carolinians an explanation” for Burr’s sale in February of up to $1.8 million in stock.

U.S. Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C.
NC Farm Bureau

ProPublica reports that N.C. Sen. Richard Burr -- the chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee -- sold as much as $1.6 million in stock on Feb. 13, during which time he was reportedly being briefed on the severity of the coronavirus outbreak.

Updated at 11:28 p.m. ET

The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee warned a small group of well-connected constituents three weeks ago to prepare for dire economic and societal effects of the coronavirus, according to a secret recording obtained by NPR.

The remarks from U.S. Sen. Richard Burr were more stark than any he had delivered in more public forums.

On Feb. 27, when the United States had 15 confirmed cases of COVID-19, President Trump was tamping down fears and suggesting that the virus could be seasonal.

All four North Carolina and South Carolina senators -- all Republicans -- voted Wednesday to acquit President Donald Trump in the Senate impeachment trial.

The battle over whether to call for additional witnesses in President Trump's impeachment trial is expected to come to a head today with all indications rank-and-file GOP senators – excluding, perhaps, Mitt Romney, Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski – will stick with their party and vote no.

Four Republicans would need to join all Democrats for the simple majority needed to approve the appearance of witnesses such as ex-Trump National Security Advisor John Bolton.

Richard Burr
@SenatorBurr / Twitter

North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr doesn’t have a leading role in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. His main task for these day-long marathon sessions has been to sit at attention in the chamber for hours on end as information and evidence is presented.

Still, he has managed to make news for the strangest of reasons: Socks and fidget spinners.

Senator Richard Burr
burr.senate.gov

Shortly after the NCAA's surprising announcement Tuesday that it would initiate plans for college athletes to earn money off their names and images, North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr issued his thoughts on the matter in a tweet.

And quickly, Burr was what's known in the social media world as "ratioed."

Senator Richard Burr
burr.senate.gov

North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr has weighed in on President Donald Trump's decision this week to withdraw United States troops from northern Syria, which is controlled by the Kurds, saying the move will destabilize the region.

The U.S. capitol building.
Architect of the Capitol / Wikipedia

Like the rest of the country, North Carolina's congressional delegation remains divided on the topic of impeachment. Predictably, those to the left of the aisle are supportive, and those to the right are largely resistant.

Sen. Thom Tillis spoke during debate on the budget agreement Thursday.
C-SPAN

Members of Congress from the Carolinas were divided, mostly along party lines, when they voted early Friday on a 2-year federal budget agreement. The bill was signed into law by President Trump.  

Leaders of the Senate Intelligence Committee say they haven't determined whether Russia colluded with Donald Trump's presidential campaign in an effort to influence last year's election. But, added committee chairman and North Carolina Republican Richard Burr, "You can't walk away from this and believe that Russia's not currently active in trying to create chaos in our election process."

via Twitter

Gun rights vs. gun control. This has become a perennial debate in modern America. After the mass shooting in Las Vegas, it's a debate that again may play out in the halls and chambers of Congress.

Both sides have their champions willing to spend heavily to help their views prevail. So a national campaign finance watchdog has created a spreadsheet to help track which politicians are receiving money from which group. North Carolina's Senators are leading this list – or at least one side of it.

Republican U.S. Senator Richard Burr
Burr's Google Plus Account

North Carolina Senator Richard Burr is one of several Senate Republicans to question the timing of President Trump's decision to fire FBI Director James Comey. 

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