rooftop solar

Duke Energy's solar rebates help homeowners, businesses and nonprofits pay for the cost of installation.
RENU ENERGY SOLUTIONS

Duke Energy will offer another round of rebates for home solar installations in January. If the past two years are any indication, they'll be snapped up quickly and there won't be enough money to go around. Some consumers and installers are plotting how to boost their chances.

Rebates would help pay for solar panels on a rooftop
Elliot Brown / Flickr

Duke Energy will begin offering solar rebates Monday in North Carolina. Solar energy advocates say it could help speed installations of rooftop solar panels.

Rebates would help pay for solar panels on a rooftop
Elliot Brown / Flickr

Duke Energy customers in North Carolina will be able to get rebates of up to $6,000 each beginning this summer for installing solar panels on their homes.  The four-year, $62 million rebate program was approved by state regulators last week. It's required under a 2017 state law designed to keep solar power growing in North Carolina.

Rebates would help pay for solar panels on a rooftop
Elliot Brown / Flickr

Duke Energy has proposed a new solar rebate program for homeowners and small businesses in North Carolina - something required as part of the state's new renewable energy law that took effect Jan. 1. 

NC WARN owns the solar panels it installed on Faith Community Church in Greensboro, and had been selling electricity to the church. But it has stopped the sales, after an order by regulators.
NC WARN

State utility regulators ruled last week that a Durham nonprofit cannot install solar panels on a church, then charge for the electricity. It wasn’t a surprise - state law says only regulated utilities can do that. WFAE's Mark Rumsey talked to environmental reporter David Boraks about the case. 

Report Illustrates NC's Unique Solar Energy Makeup

Jul 10, 2015
Ben Bradford / WFAE

North Carolina produces more solar energy than any state except California, but a new report ranks Charlotte near the bottom of major cities for solar installations.


Mike Linksvayer / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

About forty protesters rallied outside Duke Energy’s headquarters, chanting “Up with solar, down with coal,” as shareholders left the annual meeting. The clash between environmental advocates and Duke Energy about solar energy and fossil fuels also extended inside the meeting, even the demonstrations.


Rebates would help pay for solar panels on a rooftop
Elliot Brown / Flickr

North Carolina put more solar power online last year than any state other than California. But companies or homeowners wanting to put solar panels on their roofs face major restrictions. State lawmakers have introduced a bill to change that. It’s drawing opposition from Duke Energy, but also dividing solar advocates.


REC Solar

Duke Energy has expanded its investment in solar energy, and will enter a new facet of the industry: solar panels on the roofs of businesses.


Power Companies Reach Rooftop Solar Agreement In SC

Dec 12, 2014
Rebates would help pay for solar panels on a rooftop
Elliot Brown / Flickr

Electric utilities and solar energy developers across the U.S. have clashed over how much the utilities should have to pay for the energy supplied to them by homeowners with solar panels. In South Carolina, the sides reached an agreement Friday and both are claiming a win.


TW Buckner https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ / Flickr

UNC Charlotte is getting money from the U.S. Department of Energy to update its engineering program in an effort to help modernize the power grid.

The five-year project is in collaboration with three other universities.


Ben Bradford / WFAE

Americans installed solar panels at their homes last year at a record pace, and backers of rooftop solar picture a not-too-distant future, where entire neighborhoods power themselves with the sun’s rays. For now, users and the industry rely on generous tax incentives and special agreements with electric utilities to reach affordability. Duke Energy wants to reduce how much it pays customers for the energy they produce. Rooftop solar advocates call it an attack on a burgeoning industry, while the utility says it is about cost.