School Grades

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This week Governor Roy Cooper signed a law that will eliminate some of North Carolina’s high school exams – and may force Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools to make a tough decision. 

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North Carolina's annual release of test scores and graduation rates for more than 2,500 public schools provides a snapshot of inequality — and a study in the slow pace of progress.

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Just over 200 of North Carolina's 2,500 public schools earned A's from the state this year, and about half as many received an F.

standardized test
albertogp123 / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/2.0/

North Carolina will release its A-to-F school letter grades Wednesday  – and they’ll be calculated the same way they were last year. That’s despite widespread, bipartisan concerns that the state’s formula unfairly penalizes high-poverty schools. 

North Carolina public schools received their letter grades Wednesday and they stayed relatively flat. 

Across the state, about two-thirds of schools received Bs and Cs. Six percent received As or A-pluses.

Within CMS, a higher percentage of schools got As, about 12 percent, but just like the state, nearly a third got Ds and Fs. 

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Two-thirds of schools in North Carolina received Bs and Cs on new state report cards that include letter grades for the first time.

WFAE’s Lisa Worf joins All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey in the studio:

MR: What exactly is the breakdown in grades?

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Nearly 60 percent of CMS schools scored a C or below on new state report cards that include letter grades for the first time. The grades are mostly based on students’ scores on standardized tests.  Twenty percent is based on the growth of those scores from year-to-year. 

State school board member John Tate of Charlotte said the scores don’t accurately show the hard work of teachers and students at some high-poverty schools.

Parents will have some grades to review Thursday…not their child’s, but their child’s school. The grades have been the source of much worry and debate.   WFAE's Lisa Worf has this report. That's followed by an interview from WFAE's Marshall Terry with the superintendent of Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, which has set up its own system of grading schools.