Social Distancing

To help curb the spread of the coronavirus outbreak, employees in many companies are being encouraged to work from home when possible. WFAE is no different. Many of our staff members are practicing social distancing and working remotely. One of those is reporter Sarah Delia. She's leading the series "Social Distancing," which tells your stories.

How has your life changed since the outbreak of the coronavirus? Are you interacting with your neighbors differently as social distancing is encouraged? Are you working from home for the first time? Share your stories, big and small, by leaving us a voice mail at 704-916-9114.

On a Friday in early April, 56-year-old Ramona Reeves started to feel a little off at work. She’s a patient coordinator at Atrium Health, so it wasn’t hard to get a quick temperature check. It turned out she had a low-grade fever and was sent home. From that point, things took a turn for the worse.

In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, a Charlotte musician has been supporting his family and trying to uplift his fans through daily Facebook concerts.

At first, life during the pandemic wasn’t all that different for 58-year-old Michele Nichols of Weddington. She’s a bookkeeper and quickly transitioned to working from home, something she pretty much did before the outbreak. Her husband still has his job. 

But in April, the family was alerted that the Indiana nursing home where her 86-year-old father lived, had been exposed to the coronavirus.

In our series Social Distancing, we hear from you, our listeners, about the challenges and changes you’re facing in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak. With Mother’s Day right around the corner, WFAE’s Sarah Delia spoke to a Cabarrus County woman about what it was like to care for her daughter who had COVID-19.

Now it’s time for the latest installment of Social Distancing. It’s our series where we hear from you, our listeners, about the challenges and changes you’re facing in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak. In our latest story, WFAE’s Sarah Delia spoke to a Charlotte man about how his wife chose to spend her last few weeks after losing her battle with cancer during the pandemic. 

When Providence High School teacher Annie McCanless imagined the last day of school at the end of her 29-year-long career, it wasn’t anything too flashy. But she did picture it as a day full of meaningful in person goodbyes to students, and well-wishes from colleagues. 

These days, when 40-year-old Shannon comes home, she has a new routine. She's a nurse in Union County who is on the front lines, working at a coronavirus testing site.

Providing spiritual guidance and comfort to the sick is the daily calling of a hospital chaplain’s job. Holding someone’s hand to let them know they aren’t alone. Sitting next to a patient in pain. Offering words of encouragement. The goal of their work hasn’t changed, but how they go about their jobs in the wake of the coronavirus has.

"Oh, our world has been turned upside-down just like everyone else’s," said chaplain David Carl, the executive director with Spiritual Care at Atrium Health.

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus, all of our lives have changed in some way. Maybe that means you’re working from home for the first time or having to put off a major life event like a wedding or funeral.

It might mean you’re out of work, taking an unexpected financial hit …or juggling work while having your kids at home.

In our series Social Distancing, WFAE’s Sarah Delia speaks with you, our listeners, about the challenges you’re facing. WFAE is trying to do its best to work remotely, so the majority of this series, including the interviews, are being done from Sarah’s dining room table.

PXHERE

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus, all of our lives have changed in some way. Maybe that means you’re working from home for the first time or having to put off a major life event like a wedding or funeral.

In our series Social Distancing, WFAE’s Sarah Delia speaks with you, our listeners about the challenges you’re facing. WFAE is trying to do its best to work remotely, so the majority of this series, including the interviews, are being done from Sarah’s dining room table.

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus, all of our lives have changed in some way. Maybe that means you’re working from home for the first time or having to put off a major life event like a wedding or funeral.

It might mean you’re out of work, taking an unexpected financial hit or juggling work while having your kids at home.

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus, all of our lives have changed in some way. Maybe that means you’re working from home for the first time or having to put off a major life event like a wedding or funeral.

It might mean you’re out of work, taking an unexpected financial hit … or juggling work while having your kids at home.

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus, all of our lives have changed in some way. Maybe that means you’re working from home for the first time or having to put off a major life event like a wedding or funeral.

It might mean you’re out of work, taking an unexpected financial hit … or juggling work while having your kids at home.

Pexels

 

To help curb the spread of the coronavirus outbreak, employees in many companies are being encouraged to work from home when possible. WFAE is no different. Many of our staff members are practicing social distancing and working remotely. One of those, is reporter Sarah Delia. She’s been working from home and she’s looking for ways to connect with the community.

How has your life changed since the outbreak of the coronavirus? Are you interacting with your neighbors differently as social distancing is encouraged? Are you working from home for the first time? Share your stories, big and small, by leaving us a voice mail at 704-916-9114.