Teacher Pay

David Boraks / WFAE

Thousands of teachers from across North Carolina are expected to gather in Raleigh on Wednesday for a march to press their demands for more state funding for teacher pay and other improvements.  

teacher
U.S. Dept. of Education / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Slightly fewer North Carolina teachers left the profession in the 2017-2018 school year, according to the annual state report on turnover. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools are seeing similar results. The report will be presented to state board of education members on Wednesday.

Gwendolyn Glenn/ WFAE

Mecklenburg County homeowners could be hit with their first property tax increase in five years if the $1.7 billion budget that County Manager Dena Diorio presented to county commissioners Tuesday is approved. 

Marchers on Bicentennial Mall in Raleigh Wednesday headed toward the state legislature.
David Boraks / WFAE

Thousands of educators from across North Carolina gathered Wednesday at the state capitol in Raleigh to join the March for Students and Rally for Respect. Their message about the need for better pay and increased school funding was loud and clear. The response from Republican legislative leaders was a promise of more raises - but also a campaign to correct what they call misinformation about their efforts.

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Iredell-Statesville Schools is joining CMS and other school districts in the decision to make May 16 an optional teacher workday, the district said in a statement. Schools are closing in anticipation for teacher protests that will occur in Raleigh the same day.

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster has signed a new law that closes loopholes in the state's Freedom of Information Act. Meanwhile, the North Carolina House of Representatives remains on track toward getting its state budget bill approved by the end of the week. And, a North Carolina elections worker has been indicted on charges she altered the voter registrations of roughly 250 convicted felons. Here are some of WFAE's afternoon headlines.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Gov. Roy Cooper proposed average pay raises of 5 percent for teachers this year and next year in his upcoming budget. He made the announcement Monday at Collinswood Language Academy in Charlotte, surrounded by teachers.

Gov. Cooper says the two-year teacher pay raise will cost the state $813 million and he says taxes would not be raised to make it happen.

North Carolina General Assembly

The North Carolina Senate has big plans for teacher pay. Today Senate Leader Phil Berger laid out an ambitious proposal which would far exceed the roughly 4 percent in raises the House passed last week. But there’s a big question left unanswered.

When it comes to teacher pay, the North Carolina House budget falls short for Governor Pat McCrory.

The North Carolina General Assembly is back in session today. Governor McCrory and Senate leader Phil Berger have laid out their priorities. They include teacher raises that average 5 percent, and leaving HB2 mostly intact - although the governor does want a provision repealed that deals with the right to sue. But what about the priorities of lawmakers in the Charlotte area? Morning Edition host Marshall Terry talks to WFAE's David Boraks.

Courtesy of the governor's Office

Governor McCrory is proposing an average pay raise of 5 percent for teachers next year. The governor revealed a list of education budget priorities in a speech in his hometown of Jamestown Tuesday.

Sun. Headlines: NC Teacher Pay Improves

Mar 22, 2015

The latest public school teacher pay rankings show North Carolina still below the national average, but making improvement after raises were approved last summer. 

The new National Education Association report showed North Carolina ranked 47th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia during the 2013-14 school year in average teacher pay, at almost $45,000. The NEA's average pay estimate this year for North Carolina is about $47,800, compared to the national average of about $57,400.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Mecklenburg County voters will decide next week whether to increase the county’s sales tax by a quarter cent. If approved, Mecklenburg County’s sales tax would be 7.5 percent. Most of the increase would be used to boost the salaries of CMS employees. But there’s also money in there for the library system, Central Piedmont Community College and the Arts and Science Council. 

The CMS school board decided to support the quarter cent sales tax that would mostly go to teacher pay.  But board members made it clear Tuesday night they did not like how it ended up on the ballot. 


North Carolina lawmakers are still trying to reach agreement on revisions to the state’s budget,  including how much to raise teacher pay and how to fund those increases. As the rhetoric increased last week, budget negotiators in the state Senate walked out of a meeting with House leaders. Gov. McCrory then vowed to veto anything resembling the Senate's latest budget proposal.  

During an appearance Monday on WFAE's Charlotte Talks, McCrory chided Senate leaders for not listening to teachers and other educators including CMS Superintendent  Heath Morrison, whom House leaders had invited to address lawmakers. McCrory went on to note that educators were on hand to support the unveiling of the House budget plan, which the governor backs, but were absent when Senators proposed their version of the budget.   

WRAL-TV Capitol Bureau Chief Laura Leslie has seen many budget battles in Raleigh and shared some observations on the current negotiations.


Lawmakers in Raleigh Wednesday took a major step in their budget negotiations.  A step backward.

If there was any sense of congeniality and cooperation at the state capitol it was not found in room 643, where House Senior Budget Chairman Nelson Dollar called to order select members of the House and Senate  to negotiate the now overdue state budget.

WFAE

Greg, Lisa and Ben discuss the latest legislative strategy to force Charlotte city government to give up control of Charlotte-Douglas International Airport, and a proposed quarter-cent sales tax hike to help supplement the salaries of CMS employees and fund a few other programs.

Plus, Greg and Lisa talk to Ben about his big week. He was named the winner of a national Edward R. Murrow Award for this story.

Governor Pat McCrory, the state House and Senate have significant differences to work out before North Carolina adopts a budget. WFAE's Michael Tomsic looks at three examples of those differences: teacher pay, film incentives and Medicaid.

Mecklenburg County Commissioners quickly agreed on a budget Thursday that does not include a property tax increase. It’s exactly the same as the one the county manager proposed. Most of the commissioners' discussion was about how there wasn’t more discussion. 


Lisa Miller / WFAE

Mecklenburg County commissioners are weighing whether to give CMS employees a raise out of the county’s pocket be that by paying the district an extra $26.7 million or asking voters to approve a quarter cent sales tax. A few hundred teachers showed up to a public hearing last night to make their case. 

Mark Hames / Charlotte Observer

Mecklenburg County commissioners are planning for a November referendum on a proposal that would raise the county’s sales tax by a quarter of a penny to pay for salary supplements for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools employees.

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