Tim Moore

N.C. GENERAL ASSEMBLY

North Carolina Republican House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger harshly criticized Monday Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper's response to the sometimes-violent protests over the death of George Floyd.

You don't need an ID to vote in the North Carolina primaries. That's because a federal court put a state law on hold until a case challenging voter ID can be heard. Last week, a state appeals court blocked it indefinitely. In his response to the federal ruling in December, North Carolina House Speaker Tim Moore described the law as "one of the nation's most lenient voter ID laws."

President Trump graphic
Chelsea Beck/NPR

RALEIGH, N.C.  — The speaker of the North Carolina House has invited President Donald Trump to the state's legislature to deliver the State of the Union address.

Tim Moore
NORTH CAROLINA GENERAL ASSEMBLY

When it comes to drawing districts for congressional elections, House Speaker Tim Moore says North Carolina Republicans nailed it.

“Frankly, it's a model other states could follow,” says Moore. 

Higher Education Works Foundation

How to make higher education more accessible and affordable makes for some heated debate. UNC President Margaret Spellings and her counterpart in the community college system joined the House Speaker in Charlotte last week to discuss that. There was a lot of agreement on stage, but among North Carolina policy makers the topic has come with some tension. 

JOSH STEIN

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein says he's been forced to lay off 45 people in his office, some of them attorneys with more than 30 years of experience, as a result of a $10 million budget cut handed down from the General Assembly.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Republican leaders of the General Assembly made a surprising announcement Tuesday night: They had accepted an HB 2 repeal deal proposed by Democratic Governor Roy Cooper. There's just one problem. Cooper denies this particular deal was ever on the table. And the story gets even stranger.

What happened Tuesday night can be seen as a deal gone bad, political theater, or a hardcore negotiating technique.

NCGA

House Speaker Tim Moore has given his fellow Republican representatives a bit of homework this weekend.Consider a new plan which would change House Bill 2.

Change, yes, but not a full repeal. WFAE's Nick De La Canal talks with WFAE's Tom Bullock about the proposal.

NDC: Tom, let's  jump right in with the most well-known part of HB 2. Would this plan drop or change the bathroom provisions of the bill?

scales of justice
Scott*/Flickr

Three Superior Court judges are now deliberating a case that could have broad implications for how the state of North Carolina is run.

The plaintiff is Democratic Governor Roy Cooper. The defendants are House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate Pro Tem Phil Berger, the leaders of the Republican-dominated General Assembly.

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CC0 Wikipedia

With all the partisan bickering about teacher pay, bathroom use and what the governor can and can’t do these days it’s fair to say there’s a lot of animosity in the General Assembly. But on Thursday, for a very brief moment, there was a bit of bi-partisan levity. 

scales of justice
Scott*/Flickr

On Wednesday, a North Carolina Senate committee was scheduled to do something of a first: confirm a member of a governor’s cabinet.

However, late Tuesday night a three-judge panel appears to have issued a temporary order to halt the proceeding.

Governor Roy Cooper's effort to expand North Carolina's Medicaid program is on hold for at least two weeks, following a federal judge's order over the weekend. 

Charlotte Mecklenburg Police are searching for two men they say are responsible for fatally shooting a teenager as he sat in the backseat of a car with family members Monday night.

Police say 14-year-old Anthony Frazier died at Carolinas Medical Center on Tuesday. He was the son of Kannapolis police officer, Daniel Frazier.

tim moore
North Carolina General Assembly

North Carolina House Speaker Tim Moore is calling for immediate legislative action to stop Charlotte’s updated non-discrimination ordinance from taking effect. Moore and other Republican lawmakers say the ordinance is an imminent threat to public safety.


Public Domain

North Carolina state lawmakers have given themselves yet more time to pass the state’s budget. Wednesday, the House and Senate passed another continuing resolution which keeps the state funded through September 18.

Republican Lawmakers Slow The Pace

Jan 28, 2015
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North Carolina lawmakers officially kicked off the new session two weeks ago, but the work of filing bills and committee meetings began in earnest today. Since gaining control in 2010, the Republican majority has pushed major legislation aggressively from the outset. But in their fifth year, the pace has slowed, intentionally.


State legislators have descended on Raleigh for the start of the 2015 legislative session. Today’s session is largely ceremonial. The only votes scheduled are to elect leadership of the General Assembly. But there is a lot lawmakers would like to get done this year, which is why WFAE’s Tom Bullock joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry for a preview of the so-called long legislative session.

http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/

In nominating Tim Moore of Kings Mountain to be the next House speaker, Republican members of the House of Representatives decided to be led by another lawmaker from the western part of the state. And like outgoing speaker Thom Tillis, Moore spread his campaign money. He gave $253,000 to other legislative candidates.

“No one, including me, enjoys raising money," Moore says." So I would certainly say whoever is going to be speaker, majority leader, and these other caucus offices needs to be someone who has the ability and the willingness and the time to go out and raise that money."

Moore will be formally elected speaker when the General Assembly convenes in January. Medicaid expansion is getting more attention leading up to the session. Governor McCrory has said he may propose expansion, and the idea is gaining traction in other states where Republican leaders have rejected it. But incoming speaker Moore isn’t interested in joining them.