Vi Lyles

Vi Lyles and Mike Bloomberg
David Boarks / WFAE

Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles announced her endorsement of Michael Bloomberg as the Democratic presidential candidate for 2020 about two weeks ago -- and immediately began facing some backlash. One of the surprising voices to come out against the support was Lyles' own daughter, Aisha Alexander.

David Boraks / WFAE

Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles announced her support for Mike Bloomberg as the 2020 Democratic presidential nominee Thursday.

Steve Harrison/WFAE

Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles – and other city leaders – have said different things about public money going to the city’s Major League Soccer team.

shauking / Pixabay

Major League Soccer is scheduled to award its 30th team to Charlotte in a ceremony uptown on Tuesday.

Truth and Prosperity

The televsion ad begins with a booming voice:

Vi Lyles. Julie Eiselt. Proven leaders. Vi Lyles and Julie Eiselt have led Charlotte with distinction and honor embracing policies that make Charlotte a leader in job creation and economic growth.

The ad continues those kind words, but it focuses on a subject that -- for Democrats -- is touchy: The Republican National Convention.

David Boraks / WFAE

CMPD on Monday released body-cam video in the fatal shooting of Danquirs Franklin, 27, outside a Burger King on Beatties Ford on March 25.

Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles joined WFAE's Lisa Worf to offer her reactions to seeing the video.

Mayor Vi Lyles talks with the media.
David Boraks / WFAE

Updated 2:39 p.m.
Mayor Vi Lyles said Monday that keeping the Carolina Panthers in Charlotte is the single biggest  business retention challenge the city faces right now.

Erin Keever

 Tuesday, February 27, 2018

We are in a unique moment: Many of Charlotte’s top leaders are African-American. We talk with some of them - Mayor Vi Lyles, Police Chief Kerr Putney, DA Spencer Merriweather, and City Manager Marcus Jones in a special WFAE Public Conversation - "Building An Inclusive City." 

Panelists at the Charlotte Talks Public Conversation: Building An Inclusive City. From left: Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles, District Attorney Spencer Merriweather, City Manager Marcus Jones and Police Chieff Kerr Putney.
Daniel Coston / WFAE

Charlotte is in a historic moment. Most of the city's top leaders are African American. The question is how they'll shape the city as it responds to economic inequality, crime and growth. WFAE tackled that question Wednesday night in a public conversation titled "Building an Inclusive City."

We’re at a historic time in Charlotte’s political leadership. The mayor, city manager, police chief and Mecklenburg County district attorney are African-American. All will be on Charlotte Talks this week for a Public Conversation broadcast entitled: Building an Inclusive City: Charlotte’s African American Leaders Share their Vision. Charlotte Talks producer Erin Keever discusses the upcoming conversation with Morning Edition Host Marshall Terry.

Mayor Vi Lyles on Charlotte Talks for "Mike and the Mayor."
Erin Keever / WFAE

Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles says she's worried that the city's income diversity will be hurt if it continues to lose affordable housing units and doesn't improve its bus system.

Vi Lyles takes the oath of office as Charlotte's new mayor Monday night from Superior Court Judge Yvonne Mims Evans.
David Boraks / WFAE

Change - on both the city council and across the city - was the main theme Monday night as Charlotte's new mayor, Vi Lyles, and city council council were sworn in at the Government Center.  The meeting was mostly ceremonial, except for one closely watched piece of business: election of a new mayor pro tem. On that, the council stuck to tradition.

Gwendolyn Glenn

Now that the election is behind her, Mayor-elect Vi Lyles says she wants to get to know the new City Council members and work to unify the city across party lines and neighborhoods. At a press conference Wednesday, Lyles said affordable housing is one of her top priorities.

Jenifer Roser / WFAE

Election Day is now just two weeks away. Early voting has already begun.

And the big race, the one for Charlotte's next mayor, is too close to call, at least according to a Spectrum news poll.

Tuesday, the two candidates for that post, Democrat Vi Lyles and Republican Kenny Smith took part in a Charlotte Talks debate. And though few political elbows were thrown, the candidates did paint very different pictures about how they would lead.  

Greg Collard / WFAE

Charlotte’s two mayoral candidates see expanding public transit as a way to increase economic mobility in the city. Republican Kenny Smith and Democrat Vi Lyles addressed the issue on WFAE’s Charlotte Talks this morning. But they disagree on whether the streetcar is a good investment. 

Moderator Jeff Sonnier of WTVI (center) and mayoral candidates Vi Lyles and Kenny Smith watched a video clip during the debate taping Thursday. The debate airs Tuesday night on WTVI.
David Boraks / WFAE

In a half-hour debate Thursday organized by the League of Women Voters, Charlotte's two mayoral candidates went head-to-head on a variety of city issues. Democrat Vi Lyles and Republican Kenny Smith differed on taxes, tolls and city priorities. But they started by agreeing on one thing - the need for new leadership as they compete to replace current Democratic mayor Jennifer Roberts. 

The results of Tuesday's primaries are in, and it was a night of upsets in Charlotte. Young challengers beat long time incumbents and the city will have a new mayor.

Republican Kenny Smith easily won his primary. And Vi Lyles defeated Jennifer Roberts and Joel Ford in the Democratic primary. In a surprise, that race wasn't even close.

Screen Grab via WBTV

The final debate before any election is always the most contentious, the most pointed, some would say the most fun.

Wednesday night's Charlotte mayoral debate was no exception. It was televised in prime time and featured just the top tier candidates running for mayor. And it came just days before the all- important September 12 primary.

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Six of the eight candidates for mayor of Charlotte debated each other Tuesday at an event sponsored by the League of Women Voters and PBS Charlotte. It was an hour long debate. But let's focus on just one question.

Here's moderator Jeff Sonier: "The city of Charlotte is on record in support of the I-77 toll lane project between uptown and Mooresville. As mayor, would you support the current toll lane project and would you support future toll lane projects in Charlotte and surrounding communities?"

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

Mayor Jennifer Roberts is leading both her Democratic and Republican rivals in fundraising efforts and campaign spending. According to finance reports filed on Friday, Roberts' campaign has raised roughly $370,000 for the upcoming election, well ahead of Democratic challengers Vi Lyles ($223,000) and Joel Ford ($212,000), and Republican challenger Kenny Smith ($263,000).

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