FAQ City

Calling all WFAE listeners - help us investigate stories that matter to you!

We're accepting listener questions about anything and everything in the Charlotte region. No question is too broad, or too narrow; too silly, or too unusual. The only requirement is it is must relate in some way to Charlotte or the surrounding area.

Submissions can be made at any time. Every other week (with some exceptions), WFAE editors will select their favorite three or four questions and put them to an online vote. The winning question will get a full investigation that's featured both on air and on the podcast.

New FAQ City episodes are released every other Tuesday, and are typically heard on air during Here and Now in the 12 p.m. hour.

Which listener-submitted question should we answer next on the podcast? Vote for your favorite question in our latest FAQ City voting round!

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Wait - where do I enter my own submission? Good question! Write your question in the box below, and we may be in touch.

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Ways to Connect

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The FAQ City team is on vacation this weekend. Since we have so many new listeners joining us, we want to share with you one of the most popular questions we've answered on the podcast....  

COURTESY OF THE SALLIE BINGHAM CENTER FOR WOMEN’S HISTORY & CULTURE, DUKE UNIVERSITY

Ever wondered why Charlotte celebrates Pride in August, and not in June, like most other major cities? WFAE listener Jennifer Lange did.

Cole del Charco / WFAE

The spelling and pronunciation of Little Sugar Creek, which flows into Sugar Creek (or is it Sugaw Creek?) have been a source of debate for well over 200 years. Which is right?

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

How is the relationship between Charlotte and Raleigh? Are we good? Charlotte is North Carolina's largest city, while Raleigh is the state capitol. Seems like tensions between the two have been simmering on and off for decades.

Courtesy of PLCMC, Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room, Charlotte Observer Collection.

For decades, a four-foot gold statue has stood at the intersection of Queens and Providence Road, his right index finger extended. Sometimes he's dressed up for sporting events or weddings at the Methodist church next door. Last September, he disappeared from the intersection, leaving only a few patches of monkey grass where his pedestal stood.

City of Concord. NC

Does it seem like something's missing around Charlotte? Something small, green, or brown? Listener Hope Nicholls thinks so. She wrote in to FAQ City wondering about what seemed to be a total absence of cankerworms this spring.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

On this week's FAQ City, listener Margaret Peeples has lingering questions about a 2016 report in The Charlotte Observer that found between 2000 and 2016, the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department had destroyed more than 1,000 sexual assault kits.

NICK DE LA CANAL / WFAE

Today on FAQ City, listener Mark Doherty is curious about Charlotte's Revolutionary War history, specifically, where is it?

Charlotte has long been one of the nation's largest banking hub
Nick de la Canal / WFAE

Orlando has tourism, Nashville has music, seems like Charlotte has always been defined by its banks. But have you ever wondered why?

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

If you've been keeping up with the news in Charlotte, you've probably encountered the term "287(g)."

It refers to the 287(g) program, a voluntarily partnership between the Mecklenburg County Sheriff's Office and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which has become a controversial sticking point in the upcoming May 8 primary for Mecklenburg County sheriff.

If you're not too clear on what the program is, here's a basic primer.

Just off Love Hill Road in the town of Stanfield, North Carolina, about 30 miles east of Charlotte, lies a massive underground bunker built during the Cold War. A listener wonders how it came to be.
Nick de la Canal / WFAE

It wasn't too long ago — 2003 in fact — that a huge underground bunker was put up for sale just outside Charlotte. The bunker was built in the Cold War, but since emptied and covered up with weeds and rust.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

It's the end of the workday in Charlotte, and a crowd of bankers and business people are heading home for the day, striding down a plain, ordinary sidewalk next to a nondescript brown building on Trade Street.

What these business people perhaps don't know is that just below their feet, about a story or two down, is a bustling underground operation and a steel-encased vault containing billions of dollars in cash.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

On May 8, Mecklenburg voters will take to the polls to elect a new sheriff. One of the biggest issues up for debate is 287(g), a program that allows Mecklenburg sheriff’s deputies to work with federal immigration officials to screen and detain inmates. 

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

It was only around 70 years ago that Charlotte had a booming trolley system, with dozens of orange-colored streetcars running up and down the middle of Queens Road, The Plaza, and other surrounding streets and neighborhoods. That is, until the late 1930s came around, and the city dismantled the system, envisioning a future where cars and buses would become the city's primary modes of transportation.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

Listener Jeff Moen moved to Charlotte about three years ago, and has never really figured out this one quirk of his new hometown. While nearly every city in the nation calls its central business district "downtown," in Charlotte, it's "uptown."

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

Here's a riddle: Imagine two roads in Charlotte, one in the north, one in the south. Both have four lanes and plenty of rush hour traffic, but one has streetlights while the other doesn't. Seem weird?

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

If you've ever had to make a big move in your life, you can probably relate on some level to WFAE listener Julianne Wooten. She moved to Charlotte two and a half years ago from Austin, Texas, and upon arriving here, realized she couldn't find one of her favorite dishes.

istockphoto / evtushenko_ira

So imagine it's your day off. There's no work or school today. You're ready to go out and make the most of it, but the whole city has shut down, and your friends just want to stay in bed.

If you're a night worker - that is, one of less than 5 percent of Americans who work overnight - you may already know this dilemma ... And that brings us to this week's episode of FAQ City.

Courtesy of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History & Culture, Duke University

WFAE has a new initiative to connect with our audience and get story suggestions. On our website, we ask you to tell us what you wonder about the Charlotte region, its life, and culture. We recently put three questions to a vote – letting you decide the story you wanted us to cover. The overwhelming winner was a question that came to us from Jennifer Lange, a resident of Charlotte’s Steele Creek area.

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