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Updated at 8:57 p.m. ET

To say that Mike Posner's career is unpredictable is an understatement. In 2010, his debut song, "Cooler Than Me," hit the charts worldwide, and to date has sold more than two million copies in the United States. But not long after the success of that hit, Posner's career stalled, so he decided to take that time to co-write with other artists like Justin Bieber, the producer Avicii and Maroon 5.

Seeking to quell concern about the U.S. troop withdrawal from Syria, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Saturday described the American exit as a "tactical change" in military strategy that wouldn't deter efforts to defeat ISIS or hurt U.S. interests in the region.

Pompeo's remarks in Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, come after the Pentagon announced Friday that "the process of our deliberate withdrawal" had begun.

For years, despite multiple sexual abuse allegations against him, singer R. Kelly managed to stay a powerful, popular figure in both R&B and black gospel music.

President Trump says trade talks between the United States and China have been, "going very well." The United States put $250 billion worth of tariffs on Chinese goods last year, to counter what it considers unfair trade practices and theft of U.S. technology.

But there are no indications the United States, the United Nations, or any government is prepared to use any economic or diplomatic leverage to oppose China locking up between 800,000 and 2 million Uighurs, Kazakhs and other Chinese Muslims into internment camps in the western Xinjiang region.

Last time the New York Knicks played the Washington Wizards, Enes Kanter scored 18 points.

For their next game, he won't be there to score any.

Kanter recently announced he won't be joining the Knicks on Jan. 17 when they'll play the Wizards in London as part of the NBA's Global Games series because he fears for his safety.

Kanter is from Turkey and has been an avid critic of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. He says if he travels to London, he fears agents of the Turkish government might kill him.

Let's start with the big picture.

There are about 8,000 slaughterhouses and meat processors in the United States that can't legally operate without a U.S. Department of Agriculture inspector on-site. Those inspectors are working through the shutdown.

Meanwhile, 80,000 or so other food factories handle everything else, from cauliflower to cookies. The Food and Drug Administration oversees them with a very different regulatory philosophy.

Conductors, like most music lovers, keep discovering music that is new to them. My own latest discovery is the Turangalîla-Symphonie, a mind-blowing 75-minute orchestral piece by Olivier Messiaen, written in the 1940s. It's a rare treat for me to be able to work on a piece from the middle of the 20th century that I have never even heard performed live.

Updated 12:54 p.m. ET

Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro formally launched his bid for president on Saturday, after weeks of hinting he was ready to join the growing 2020 Democratic primary field.

Castro said, "I've always believed with big dreams and hard work anything is possible in this nation."

Romance: it's complicated. As these three novels show, it's far from just the simple premise of boy meets girl ... and they got married and lived happily ever after in some fictional la-la land. The best romances draw on real life to spin stories of love and overcoming challenges on the quest for happy ever after — and here are three of the best for January.

Updated Saturday at 1:14 p.m. ET.

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

'On Monday we will be ready to strike'

Los Angeles is bracing for a teacher strike, which could affect roughly 480,000 public school students.

On one side is the LA Unified School District; on the other, United Teachers Los Angeles, a union of more than 30,000 members who have been working without a contract for over a year.

The partial government shutdown is now the longest in history, as Saturday marks Day 22. The previous record was 21 days, set in the winter of 1995-96 when President Bill Clinton and House Speaker Newt Gingrich were at odds over budget cuts.

Updated at 4:28 p.m. ET

President Trump, amid the longest shutdown in U.S. history, has channeled his wrath at the FBI, following a New York Times report that the agency launched an investigation into whether he had been working on Russia's behalf when he fired James Comey as director of the bureau in May 2017.

Trump took to Twitter on Saturday, beginning a stream of angry tweets around 7 a.m. He did not refute the Times' reporting but instead went after the integrity of the nation's main federal law enforcement agency.

SpaceX, the pioneering space technology company led by Elon Musk, will lay off about 10 percent of its more than 6,000 employees.

The news was first reported by the Los Angeles Times.

In a statement, a company spokesman confirmed the layoff without specifying how many employees will be released.

Updated at 8:43 p.m. ET

Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard will seek the Democratic nomination for president in 2020, she told CNN in an interview.

A jury in California, in a first-of-its-kind verdict, agreed that federal prosecutors could strip a trademarked logo from a Los Angeles-based motorcycle club known as the Mongols as punishment for its members' criminal activity.

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