Cass Herrington

Cass Herrington is BPR's Morning Edition host and news reporter. Her reporting largely focuses on stories dealing with health, race, and immigration. 

Before joining BPR in 2019, Herrington spent nearly seven years writing, reporting and hosting for NPR stations in Illinois and Indiana. 

Her reporting has earned numerous awards, including the designations of best reporter by the Associated Press Broadcaster’s Associations in Indiana, Illinois and Kentucky.

In 2015, Cass received a prestigious national Edward R. Murrow award for a show she produced about non-verbal teens with Autism who rely on iPads to communicate.

A Kentucky native, Herrington graduated from the University of Kentucky with a degree in journalism, international studies and Spanish. She's fluent in Spanish, loves to travel, and is a proud, bleed-blue Kentucky Wildcats fan. 

Herrington also co-hosts a podcast, called Skillet, about the intersection of food and memory.

ID card
Cass Herrington / BPR

One town in Transylvania County has begun issuing identification cards to those who may not be able to obtain a government-issued state ID or driver’s license. The grassroots initiative wants to serve the community’s residents who don’t have legal citizenship. 

DACA students protest in this file photo.
JASON PRAMAS / CREATIVE COMMONS

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to hear oral arguments next month in a case that could determine the fate of the nearly 700,000 individuals protected by Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

JOHN KLAUSMEYER / UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL ARCHAEOLOGY

About 450 years ago, Spanish soldiers on an expedition from Florida took over the native Catawba town of Joara, about 60 miles east of Asheville. 

SAMANTHA CALDERON-COLON / BPR NEWS

Health care providers that cater services to seasonal and migrant farmworkers in western North Carolina are increasingly turning their attention to mental health care.

Farmworkers who travel seasonally for harvesting and planting often bring with them hardships and emotional stressors, like trauma and homesickness. But certain barriers make care difficult, like language and a lack of transportation.

SAMANTHA CALDERON-COLON / BPR NEWS

Migrant farmworkers in rural areas face a lot of pressure — from language barriers to geographic isolation to the current political climate surrounding immigration. Add in the limited access to mental health care in rural locales, and it puts workers who travel to western North Carolina for the harvest season in an even tougher position. 

A North Carolina immigration judge who’s known for frequently deporting asylum cases has been appointed to the Board of Immigration Appeals. 

An immigration judge in Charlotte is ordering for the removal of a Salvadorian woman in Western North Carolina who fled gang violence in her home country.

On Friday, BPR News aired the story of a young woman living in Western North Carolina who fled violence in El Salvador as a teenager. This week she faces possible deportation.

Two years ago, the Trump administration through the Justice Department changed policies making it tougher for migrants and refugees in the U.S. to be granted asylum.

One of the changes has created a growing backlog of pending cases in the courts -- with thousands of individuals seeking sanctuary status who now face deportation.

That includes one 21-year-old woman living in Henderson County. She’s fighting an order that would send her back to her native El Salvador, where she says a violent gang murdered her father and threatens to kill her, too.

 

For Spanish learners, the city of Asheville is plentiful with opportunities to improve their language skills.

For a group of Buncombe County Schools Early College students, that means visiting McCormick Field, where players from Venezuela and the Dominican Republic are holding class.