Union County Public Schools

Union County Public Schools

Union County School Board member Travis Kiker resigned Monday after other board members learned about Facebook posts that board Chair Melissa Merrell described as "insensitive and inappropriate."

ANN DOSS HELMS / WFAE

If you’d told Jonathan Bryant a few months ago that Lincoln Charter School would pay $10,000 for a graduation venue and ask families to drive an hour to get there, he’d have thought you were crazy. But the coronavirus has uprooted traditions that go so deep in our culture that we barely think about them until they’re banned.

Now the longest, strangest and most controversial graduation season in memory is underway.

Pexels

Union County’s school board voted Thursday night to hold traditional high school graduations outdoors at school stadiums. The plans are in defiance of Gov. Roy Cooper’s Phase 2 restrictions on large gatherings.

Photo by Charles DeLoye on Unsplash

Union County Public Schools Board has voted to hold an in-person graduation ceremony for all its high schools that would be a violation of the state’s coronavirus safety orders.

UNSPLASH

The North Carolina Board of Education voted Thursday to stick with the state’s special pass-withdraw grading system for seniors. Some board members argued for an option that would let seniors boost their grade-point average.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

When people talk about what the coronavirus has done to North Carolina schools, you’ll generally hear some variation on this statement by Gov. Roy Cooper: "School classrooms may be closed, but the learning is not over."

And then you’ll hear something like this from Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board Chair Elyse Dashew: "We’ve got to work together, more than we ever have before, to help these kids who could so easily slip through the cracks."

standardized test
albertogp123 / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/2.0/

Average SAT scores for the Charlotte region's class of 2019 ranged from 1240 at Providence High, a large public school in southeast Charlotte, to 861 at Charlotte Learning Academy, a small, struggling charter school that closed at the end of the year.

Cabarrus County Sherriff's Office
Cabarrus County Sherriff's Office

A former Cabarrus County high school softball coach was arrested yesterday on charges of indecent liberties with a minor.

Robert Enloe Jr., 50, is accused of sex offenses involving a student in 1994 and 1995 while he was working at Cabarrus County Schools. The victim reported the incidents to the Cabarrus County Sheriff’s Department in April.  

The Union County school board voted Tuesday night to assign about 4,000 students to different schools next year. That reverses some of the changes the board made as part of another big reassignment in 2014. Board members say too many schools are now underutilized and they want more students to go to schools closer to home. 

Jimmy Wayne / Flickr

Union County no longer has to pay its school system $91 million. In 2013, that’s what a jury said the county owed the district for years of under funding. The North Carolina Court of Appeals Tuesday granted a new trial. 


Lisa Worf / WFAE

The Union County Public School board voted yesterday to file a criminal complaint regarding one of its board members.  The board says it appears Marce Savage stole $2,600 from taxpayers by double-dipping and filing false mileage reports. 

First, the board censured Savage a couple weeks ago. Then, it turned over her expense requests to the Sheriff. Yesterday, the board approved this motion from board member Rick Pigg:   

The Union County school board approved a controversial redistricting Tuesday night to boos and hisses. The crowd was vocal, but not large since the vote came as a complete surprise. 


Union County School Board OKs Controversial Redistricting Plan

Mar 5, 2014
Lisa Miller

Union County’s school board, in a surprise vote, approved a controversial redistricting plan Tuesday night before a raucous, upset crowd.

Flickr/Seth Sawyers / http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidewalk_flying/4267034867/sizes/l/

Union County is one of two North Carolina school districts accused of making it difficult for youth who are in the country illegally to enroll.  The Southern Poverty Law Center along with other groups filed the complaint with the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division. 


Lisa Miller

Union County Public Schools got word of an unexpected offer last night that could allow the district to avoid a controversial redistricting, at least for now. The county has agreed to give the school district $3 million for mobile classrooms to ease overcrowding. 

Union County might be spared a controversial countywide school redistricting plan after all.

School board chair Richard Yercheck said Tuesday morning he expects his group will accept the county commissioners’ surprise $3 million offer to buy 49 mobile units. Commissioners on Monday said they made the offer to eliminate the need for countywide redistricting, and solve an issue that has been tearing the community apart

Nearly 6,000 students in Union County could end up in different schools next year.  The Union County school board is considering a plan to re-draw attendance zones of many schools to ease overcrowding and make way for expected growth.  That has caused an uproar among parents. 


 

Jimmy Wayne / Flickr

Union County and its school board continue to bicker over funding.  But since October, it’s taken a different tone after a jury ordered Union County to pay the school system $91 million.  Union County commissioners offered a much smaller settlement this month and the school board said, “No, thank you.”


Jimmy Wayne / Flickr

The dispute between Union County and its schools is not finished.  Union County commissioners have decided to appeal the jury’s verdict that the county owes the district $91 million. 


Jimmy Wayne / Flickr

Union County Public Schools has scored a victory.  After a two-month long trial, a jury has decided Union County owes the district a whopping $91 million. 

“To be perfectly honest, I’m in awe and humbled at the number,” says school board chairman Richard Yercheck. 

“I think whoever tells you they’re not surprised at a verdict of $91 million would be lying to you,” says attorney Richard Schwartz who represented the district.

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