CMS, UNC Charlotte Closed Today In Preparation For Hurricane Michael

Oct 10, 2018

Updated 6:10 a.m.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools are closed today because of Hurricane Michael. CMS joins other area school districts that have announced school closures, citing safety of students and staff.

"The district recognizes the impact of school closings on families in the community and made this decision in consultation with law enforcement and weather experts, city and county leaders and other area school districts," CMS said in a Wednesday evening statement. 

The district said it has not yet determined if schools will reopen Friday. CMS said it will update families, students and staff through "direct phone calls, social media, the CMS website and area media outlets."

UNC Charlotte announced this morning that there are no classes today. 

As Hurricane Michael moves inland, the storm is projected to sweep through the Carolinas in the afternoon and into the evening. In preparation for the heavy rainfall and gusty winds, schools are also closed in Cabarrus, Union, Anson, and Richmond counties in North Carolina. School systems closed in South Carolina include Fort Mill, Rock Hill, Chester, Chesterfield, Lancaster, York, and Clover.

Lancaster Superintendent Johnathan Phipps
Credit Lancaster County Public Schools Facebook

Lancaster County Superintendent Johnathan Phipps said in a press conference Wednesday afternoon that the district is closing schools in case of power outages and flooding in buildings, which he said schools already experienced during Hurricane Florence.

“We just want to make sure our students are safe and we will re-evaluate tomorrow night and during the day tomorrow to let you know about Friday,” Phipps said.

Richmond County schools assured students and parents on the district website that homecoming activities at local high schools, which are set for Friday, will remain as scheduled.

The National Hurricane Center predicts that the Charlotte area will receive 4 to 6 inches of rain, with other parts of North Carolina at the Virginia border possibly facing 6 to 10 inches.