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Politics
The 2022 midterm elections will be the first of the Biden era. They will also be the first since the 2020 census, which means likely changes to congressional districts. There will be at least two open U.S. Senate races in the Carolinas as well, with the seats held by Richard Burr in North Carolina and Tim Scott in South Carolina up for grabs. Both Burr and Scott are Republicans. Burr is not seeking reelection, and jockeying for his seat began as early as January 2021.

See how NC redistricting changed congressional, legislative maps in the Charlotte area

North Carolina lawmakers voted on new maps for the U.S. House and the state General Assembly in 2021. Changes were made to account for new population figures from the 2020 census, and North Carolina picked up a 14th U.S. House seat.

The congressional map approved by the GOP-controlled legislature creates big changes for the Charlotte area. The map used in 2020 had Mecklenburg mostly in the 12th District (Rep. Alma Adams, D) with some southeastern parts in the 9th District (Dan Bishop, R). The new map has most of what's now Adams' area in the 9th District and Bishop's in the 8th. It would also put part of northwestern Mecklenburg in a newly created district (No. 13) that's expected to skew Republican.

That new district is already causing a stir, with firebrand Republican U.S. Rep. Madison Cawthorn, who currently represents the western mountain area of the state, announcing he'll run closer to Charlotte.

You'll be able to use the slider on the following graphics to see how districts changed from the maps used in the 2020 election to those that will be used in the 2022 election.

Now, it's possible the maps could change due to legal challenges. As of Nov. 17, 2021, at least two lawsuits had been filed challenging the U.S. House map, for example.

(Use the slider on the graphic above to see how districts changed. Can't see it? Click here.)

The maps impact not just North Carolinians' representation in Washington but also in Raleigh. Here's a look at how lawmakers changed the districts for the North Carolina House of Representatives.

(Use the slider on the graphic above to see how districts changed. Can't see it? Click here.)

In the Charlotte area, that means Mecklenburg County gets a 13th N.C. House seat. WFAE political reporter Steve Harrison says that seat favors Democrats but that the new map makes it more likely that Republicans could pick up a few seats in Mecklenburg if there's a "red wave" in 2022. Right now, Democrats have 11 of 12 N.C. House seats in Mecklenburg, under the map used in 2020. Here's a zoomed-in look at Mecklenburg County's N.C. House districts.

(Use the slider on the graphic above to see how districts changed. Can't see it? Click here.)

And here's how the North Carolina Senate maps changed.

(Use the slider on the graphic above to see how districts changed. Can't see it? Click here.)

In the Charlotte area, that spells trouble for Democratic state Sen. Natasha Marcus. She's been moved into a district that includes Republican-leaning Iredell County. Democrats currently hold all five Mecklenburg state Senate seats under the map used in 2020. Here's a closer look at the changes to Mecklenburg.

(Use the slider on the graphic above to see how districts changed. Can't see it? Click here.)

WFAE will be watching for any further updates to legislative and congressional redistricting in North Carolina. You can read the latest updates here.

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