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Charlotte Talks: Millennials Run For Office / Rift Between Trump And CEOs

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Millennial Action Project
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Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017

Younger faces are looking to influence Charlotte and North Carolina politics. Guest host Michael Bitzer talks with millennial politicians, then discusses a growing divide between the Trump White House and business leaders.

PART ONE

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The Charlotte primary last week set the stage for a possible generational makeover on the City Council: millennials and others in their 30s could hold a near majority on the city council this fall.

Millennials are hoping to flex their muscles in state legislatures, including North Carolina’s, where a millennial caucus formed this summer with a dozen members. The group includes Mecklenburg Representative Chaz Beasley, 31, and 25-year-old Kyle Hall, a Stokes County Republican who is the youngest member of the General Assembly.

Beasley and Hall share their experience as millennials seeking office, and discuss the newly-formed caucus, which is being replicated in other states through the Millennial Action Project. We hear from the group, and from the Pew Research Center on millennial attitudes toward politics.

GUESTS

Rep. Chaz Beasley, North Carolina House, District 92 (D-Mecklenburg) (@ChazBeasley)

Rep. Kyle Hall, North Carolina House, District 91 (R-Stokes, Rockingham) (@KyleHallNC)

Layla Zaidane, Millennial Action Project, chief operating officer (@layla_says)

Alec Tyson, Pew Research Center, senior researcher (@alec_h_tyson)

PART TWO

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The corner office has been hostile territory for the "businessman president."

Executives abandoned President Trump’s business councils after his “both sides” comments on Charlottesville.

Earlier this summer, corporate leaders similarly left White House boards because of the president’s exit from the Paris climate agreement. C.E.O.s from some of the country’s largest companies had lobbied the president to stick with the climate accord.

The president’s moves on DACA protections for young immigrants have created another schism between the White House and the business community.

It’s all uncharted territory, says Yale School of Management’s Jeffrey Sonnenfeld. He discusses the changing relationship between the c-suite and the Oval Office.

GUEST

Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, Yale School of Management, senior associate dean for leadership studies, Lester Crown Professor in Management Studies (@JeffSonnenfeld)