Deadly Protests in Charlottesville

The violence in Charlottesville, Va., began on Friday, August 11, when white nationalists  protesting the planned removal of a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee marched across the campus of the University of Virginia sparking some violent clashes. The next day, after "Unite the Right" demonstrators and counter-protesters clashed, the driver of a car crashed into counter-protesters, killing Heather Heyer and injuring 19 others. Two state troopers who had been working the protests also died when their helicopter crashed. 

Moses Apostaticus / Flickr

A small group of white supremacist demonstrators and hundreds of counter protesters marched in the nation’s capital Sunday on the one-year anniversary of the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, that left one person dead. There were no organized movements in Charlotte this past weekend, but the reverberations of the events last year are still felt locally. We spoke with people in Charlotte’s University area on their reflections a year later. 

CHIP SOMODEVILLA / GETTY IMAGES

A small group of white supremacist demonstrators rallied next to the White House on Sunday, one year after the "Unite The Right" demonstration by the same organizer turned deadly in Charlottesville, Va.

The Conversation: Charlottesville: A Step In Our Long Arc Toward Justice

Aug 12, 2018
Anthony Crider / Wikimedia Commons

COMMENTARY:

The number and exuberance of white nationalists who descended on Charlottesville sent emotional tremors through the nation. Some worried that this was the beginning of an expanding movement that would hearken us back to darker times.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

In downtown Charlottesville, Va., authorities are limiting car and pedestrian traffic, dozens of police in riot gear are patrolling a park in the city's center and some residents have left town in case the weekend turns violent.

Updated August 13

One year after the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., hundreds of counterprotesters overwhelmed the small number of 'this year's Unite the Right' rally attendees in Washington D.C.

Last year, when neo-Nazis and members of the so called alt-right demonstrated in Charlottesville, Va., many Americans evinced shock that such a thing could happen: A demonstration of the white power movement, in 2017. But it's only the latest in a history of social activism that goes back decades — and, as Kathleen Belew argues in her new book, Bring the War Home, we ignore that history at our peril.

Singer Dave Matthews, who formed his band in Charlottesville, Va. in 1991, will host a benefit concert for the city following last month's violent protests there. Justin Timberlake, Ariana Grande, Pharrell, Chris Stapleton, The Roots and Brittany Howard of The Alabama Shakes are slated to perform, along with other not-yet-named special guests.

Civil War reenactment at Historic Brattonsville in 2016.
Culture & Heritage Museums / Mike Watts

Since the violent clashes earlier this month in Charlottesville, Virginia, communities across the South have been debating the future of their own Confederate statues and monuments.  The recent events have also raised questions about another long-standing tradition -- reenactments of the Civil War. In Manassas, Virginia, safety concerns prompted organizers to cancel a two-day reenactment that was scheduled to begin Friday. 

Reenactments are also part of the programming at Historic Brattonsville, a living history museum in York County, South Carolina.  A Civil War reenactment is scheduled there for October 28-29, but the venue is evaluating whether to proceed with this year's event.

Statue of Henry Lawson Wyatt, Confederate soldier, on the capitol grounds in Raleigh.
Ron Cogswell / Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/by-2.0/

Communities across the South face renewed pressure to remove Confederate monuments, following the deadly weekend violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.  In North Carolina, more than 200 monuments and memorials are dedicated to the Confederacy or Confederate soldiers, according to UNC history professor W. "Fitz" Brundage.

A majority of Americans think President Trump's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., was "not strong enough," according to an NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Fifty-two percent of respondents said so, as compared with just over a quarter (27 percent) who thought it was strong enough.

President Trump is not the only world leader facing criticism for a delayed condemnation of Saturday's white nationalist march in Charlottesville, Va.

For three days, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — an outspoken critic of anti-Semitism around the world — said nothing about the anti-Jewish chants and Nazi swastikas paraded in Charlottesville.

President Trump is placing blame for the violence at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville over the weekend on “both sides,” including counter-protesters. But what is true about what happened that day?

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Sarah Rankin (@sarah_rankin), a reporter for The Associated Press who was in Charlottesville that day.

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

President Trump declared Wednesday he is disbanding two economic advisory panels, after a growing number of the corporate CEO's who sat on them decided to leave, in the wake of Trump's response to the violence in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend.

Trump said in a tweet that he is ending the Manufacturing Jobs Initiative and the Strategic and Policy Forum "rather than putting pressure on the businesspeople" that made up those groups.

At a theater in Charlottesville, Va., the mother of Heather Heyer issued a rallying cry.

"They tried to kill my child to shut her up," Susan Bro said. "Well, guess what. You just magnified her."

She invoked her daughter's famous Facebook post — "If you're not outraged, you're not paying attention."

The events that unfolded in Charlottesville last weekend are a stark reminder of how far we haven't come as a nation. Like so many Americans, I am horrified that white supremacist and neo-Nazi adherents have recently found sanction to put hateful ideologies more overtly on display.

Seeing images of torch-bearers one day and heavily-armed men as would-be militias the next, it's unsurprising that violence erupted, leading to injuries and death.

President Trump roiled opinion Tuesday by reversing himself and reiterating his claim that "both sides" of a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., were to blame for violence that killed one woman and left many injured.

Trump made the remarks at a news conference at Trump Tower in New York, engaging in back-and-forth exchanges with reporters about what transpired in Charlottesville over the weekend.

To walk around Berlin is to constantly, inevitably, trip over history.

Almost literally, in the case of the Stolpersteine, or "stumbling stones," embedded in the sidewalks outside homes where victims of the Holocaust once lived.

Germany's culture of "remembrance" around the Nazi years and the Holocaust is a well-documented and essential part of the nation's character. Though occasionally political parties may challenge it, those elements have thus far remained thoroughly fringe.

The former president's message after the violence in Charlottesville, Va., was brief, but it hit the right note for many.

"No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion ... ," Barack Obama tweeted, accompanied by a photo of himself, jacket slung over his shoulder, smiling at four young children gathered at a windowsill.

On the same night that torch-bearing white nationalists wound up staging a rally at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Van Jones stood at a podium, in the nation's capital, telling a theater full of supporters why they should let love rule in the face of racial hatred.

Pages