SouthBound

The South… What is it? Movies, books, songs, myths and legends have tried to explain this part of the United States. SouthBound, a podcast series from WFAE, talks to people who were born and raised in the South. Hosted by journalist Tommy Tomlinson, SouthBound features conversations with notable Southerners from all walks of life – from artists and athletes to preachers and politicians.

New episodes will come out every other week on Wednesday. Subscribe:
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Who would you like to hear on the SouthBound podcast? Submit your favorite Southerner below and the question you would love for them to answer. Who knows... you might just hear them on a future episode.

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There's a reason you don't see Hanna Raskin’s face in this photo – she tries to keep it hidden for her job.

JEN ROSENSTEIN

There was a young woman named Emily Feimster from a small town in North Carolina. She was an athlete in high school and college, presented as a debutante, graduated summa cum laude, had the whole world in front of her. But she didn’t know what she wanted to be. And more than that, she didn’t know who she really was.

Self-portrait by Burk Uzzle

You might not have heard the name Burk Uzzle – if you did, you’d remember it. But it’s likely that you’ve seen his work.

Photo courtesy of Brooklyn Decker

Today's episode is a replay of our conversation with Brooklyn Decker from October 2018. Decker grew up outside of Charlotte, where SouthBound is based, and was discovered at a mall by a talent scout for a modeling agency. When we talked, she was back in town to see family.

Andy Tennille

The Drive-By Truckers’ new album “The Unraveling” comes out Jan. 31. Patterson Hood co-founded the band in 1996 with his longtime musical partner Mike Cooley.

No matter your culture or upbringing, at some point, if you live in the South, you wind up in a Waffle House.

Here’s a holiday gift from us here at SouthBound: a replay of our 2018 interview with fashion icon Andre Leon Talley.

Erika Council grew up among food royalty.

One of her grandmothers owned the classic soul-food restaurant Mama Dip’s in Chapel Hill. And now Erika has found her own prominent place in Southern food, especially through her biscuits, the centerpiece of her Bomb Biscuits pop-up meals in Atlanta.

Vivian Howard

Today we’re replaying a previously aired episode of "SouthBound" with chef and TV host Vivian Howard.

When author Kevin Wilson talks about combustibles, he means exactly what he says. His new novel, “Nothing To See Here,” features a set of twins who, when they get agitated, literally catch on fire.

Mitch Landrieu
Mitch Landrieu

Mitch Landrieu comes from one of the South’s most storied political families.

His dad, Moon Landrieu, was mayor of New Orleans for 28 years. His sister, Mary, was a U.S. Senator. Mitch was lieutenant governor of Louisiana and then mayor of New Orleans from 2010 to 2018. After leaving office he founded the E Pluribus Unum Fund to study issues involving race in the South.

Steve Cody

Maurice Manning writes poems about turnips, and copperheads, and tire swings, and a woman who gets her apron strings caught in an old wringer washer. His work is dug from the ground of the Kentucky farmland where he lives. But it’s also elevated, universal, as high and expansive as the stars.

Ebru Yildiz

When you listen to Rhiannon Giddens, you might hear a little bit of anything. She grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina, biracial and multicultural and absolutely omnivorous when it came to music.

Author photo by Kathryn Schulz

Harper Lee wrote one of the classic novels in American history, “To Kill a Mockingbird.” A second novel, “Go Set a Watchman,” was published under a cloud of controversy a few months before her death. But there was another book that Harper Lee worked on – a nonfiction story from her home state of Alabama that involved a preacher, a series of mysterious deaths, and possibly voodoo.

Ben Folds has pounded pianos into submission around the world for the past 25 years, playing everything from ballads to heavy-metal covers to symphonic pieces – often in the same night.

Melissa Rawlins/ESPN Images

In Southeastern Conference football history, the true legends go by just one name. Bear. Herschel. Bo. And now there’s another, although you have to stretch it out: Pawwwwwwwwl.

David Crockett spent years as one of the announcers for Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling, the wrestling promotion based in the Carolinas from the '50s through the '80s. His dad, Jim Crockett, founded the business.

Barb Bondy

Kyes Stevens went from her tiny hometown in Alabama to Sarah Lawrence College in New York. For a lot of people it might have been a springboard to a bigger world. But Stevens ended up going back home and making her own world bigger.

Courtesy of Drew Lanham

Listening to Drew Lanham is like standing in a field and hearing the sounds of nature wash over you. Lanham grew up in the country in South Carolina and fell in love with watching birds. Eventually, he turned that love into his career.

Courtesy of Ed Currie

On a patch of farmland down in South Carolina, a man named Ed Currie grows the hottest peppers on Earth. The Guinness Book of World Records says so – they’ve certified his pepper called the Carolina Reaper as the hottest ever measured. During this episode I try some sauce made from those peppers. It’s called Chocolate Plague. I’m relieved to still be here to tell you about it.

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