Gun Control Debate

@NC_GOVERNOR / TWITTER

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper has signed an executive directive to have the state's top law enforcement agency train local law enforcement agencies on threat assessment and to improve the quality of information that the state provides for background checks for firearm purchases.

The North Carolina legislative building in Raleigh.
NICK DE LA CANAL / WFAE

During a news conference at the state legislative building Tuesday, UNC Charlotte shooting survivor Drew Pescaro called on lawmakers to pass two gun control bills filed earlier this year. 

Trump Wants To Take Guns Away From People In Crisis. Will That Work?

Aug 6, 2019
UNSPLASH

In his response Monday to mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, President Donald Trump called for an expansion of state laws that temporarily prevent someone in crisis from buying or possessing a gun.

WFAE

Following this past weekend's deadly mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper is pressing lawmakers to pass a so-called “red flag” bill. 

SETH WENIG / AP

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the National Rifle Association's federal lawsuit against him is "frivolous." The lawsuit claims that Cuomo's policies are trying to deprive the NRA of its First Amendment rights by making it more difficult for the organization to function in the state.

Public Domain

Democratic lawmakers want to make it legal in North Carolina for a judge to temporarily take away guns from anyone found to be an imminent threat to themselves or others. But it doesn’t look likely that the bill will pass.

February's mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., which left 17 dead and 17 more wounded, horrified people across the country, spurring student walkouts and marches in support of stricter gun control laws, including universal, comprehensive background checks and a ban on assault weapons. But gun debates in the United States have proven to be contentious and intractable.

A disability rights group in Texas sent out a survey last month, trying to figure out how many of its members became disabled by gun violence. The group, ADAPT of Texas, says it's an effort to collect data that will help inform Texas lawmakers about how they should legislate guns.

Bob Kafka, an organizer with ADAPT, says when gun violence occurs, particularly mass shootings, the public tends to have a pretty limited discussion about what happens to the victims.

Gun rights demonstrators rallied at state capitols across the U.S. Saturday to show support for gun ownership. A group called The National Constitutional Coalition of Patriotic Americans created Facebook events for pro-gun gatherings in all 50 states, and its co-founder David Clayton told The Associated Press that organizers secured permits for rallies in 45 states. It has been three weeks since Parkland, Fla.

When the parishioners at the Lighthouse Mexico Church Of God gather for worship each Sunday, many of them are armed.

The fact that they carry is no secret. The church, located in the small, upstate town of Mexico, N.Y., says on its website that it's "not a gun-free zone." Pastor Ron Russell began to encourage church members to carry concealed weapons after Dylann Roof killed nine people at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, S.C. in 2015.

The growing momentum for tighter gun control after the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Fla., is highlighting the National Rifle Association's history of aggressively confronting challenges to what it regards as Second Amendment rights.

Federal limits on both research into gun violence and the release of data about guns used in crimes are powerful reminders of the lobbying group's advantages over gun control activists. For decades, the NRA pushed legislation that stifled the study and spread of information about the causes of gun violence.

Gun rights groups, including the NRA, have seen a rise in membership since the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., in February. But one group in particular has had a major increase well before that. The National African American Gun Association's numbers tripled after the inauguration of President Trump.

KERI BROWN/WFDD

Gunmaker Remington Outdoor Co. officially filed for bankruptcy this week. It has struggled in recent years due to several lawsuits and a slump in gun sales. 

Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, responding to this past weekend's March For Our Lives events across the nation, is proposing what some might call a radical solution to prevent further gun violence — repealing the Second Amendment.

The National Rifle Association acknowledged that it accepts foreign donations but says it does not use them for election work — even as federal investigators look into the role the NRA might have played in Russia's attack on the 2016 election.

The night before one of the biggest rallies in Washington, D.C., history, Sam Zeif is beat.

It's been a long day. It started with an early-morning hit on CNN, then another with ABC's Good Morning America, followed by an afternoon trip to MSNBC — not for the first time. Just two days earlier, he was in Los Angeles, filming a segment with Ellen DeGeneres.

Firearms manufacturer Remington Outdoor has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in hopes of staving off creditors amid a slump in sales and public outcry over gun violence.

Reuters reports that Remington's creditors, including Franklin Templeton Investments and JPMorgan Asset Management, have agreed to exchange debt for equity in the company.

Remington was founded in 1816 in upstate New York and is one of the largest and oldest U.S. producers of firearms. It was bought in 2007 by Cerberus Capital Management for $118 million.

Hundreds of thousands of marchers rallied across the United States and around the world Saturday to demand action against gun violence. The "March for Our Lives" protest displayed the resilience behind a new wave of political activism, led by survivors of the Feb. 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.

For many students, the rallies were their first demonstration for a cause and a social reckoning of what they are capable of. They bundled in the nation's capital, delivering a defiant message: stricter gun regulation.

"March for Our Guns" organizer Brent Webber opened the rally in Helena, Mont., on Saturday with a fiery speech: "Our freedoms come first. No one will infringe on our right to keep and bear arms."

Webber spoke to hundreds of people gathered near the steps of the state Capitol. They were there in response to calls for stricter gun control measures at "March for Our Lives" rallies in Montana and across the country.

Similar pro-gun marches were held in Utah, Idaho and other states.

Nearly three-fourths of U.S. teachers do not want to carry guns in school, and they overwhelmingly favor gun control measures over security steps meant to "harden" schools, according to a new Gallup poll.

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