Arts & Culture

News and information about arts and culture from Charlotte and the Carolinas. 

Courtesy of Raymond Grubb

 


It all started ahead of the 2016 Charlotte Pride Parade and Festival in late August. Artist Jason Watson, formerly an artist in residence at the McColl Center for Art and Innovation, had an idea. He knew parade participants would be lining up in front of the McColl center in uptown Charlotte, and that participants would likely need safe restrooms to use.

Everyday Sunday Facebook page.

About a decade ago, the band Everyday Sunday had several hits on the Christian Rock music charts. The band's founder, Trey Pearson, switched to independent record labels a few years ago.  Pearson, now 35, made headlines earlier this year by publicly announcing that he is gay.  

Courtesy of Charlotte Pride.

There have been many events canceled in North Carolina because of House Bill 2, but you can’t count this weekend’s Charlotte Pride Festival and Parade as one of them.

Kimberly Melton, is the Executive Director and first full time employee of Charlotte Pride. Melton pointed out this is one event that is expected to be in high attendance because of HB2. She spoke to WFAE’s Sarah Delia about the increased security around the festival and parade this weekend.


Scott Durfree

Everyone deals with stress in different ways. For some it’s meditation or running. For one woman in Concord, it’s an arcade game in the midst of what some might say is making a bit of a comeback...pinball. She’s so good in fact, she’s ranked as the number one player in the state of North Carolina. WFAE’s Sarah Delia’s caught up with the local pinball wizard and has this story.

WFAE

Over the past week, you may have noticed a strange new phenomenon…people staring down at their phones…not to read text messages…but to catch Pokemon. The game invented in the mid 1990’s is seeing a resurgence around the country through the Pokemon Go app. WFAE’s Sarah Delia went on the hunt for would-be Pokemon masters.

Tom Bullock

The Confederate battle flag flew above the South Carolina capitol or on its grounds for 44 years. That changed after the massacre at Emmanuel AME Church in Charleston. Photos emerged of accused killer Dylann Roof with the flag. Demands to take it down intensified, and the Confederate flag was gone three weeks later.

It was sent to a state museum for display. But as Sarah Delia reports from Columbia, that display isn’t going to happen anytime soon.

Taylor Dabney

Last year’s massacre at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina renewed the debate over gun control, racism…and the Confederate battle flag that flew outside the South Carolina statehouse at the time.

For Virginia artist and former McColl Center for Art +Innovation resident Sonya Clark, the Confederate flag has long been a part of her work. In a piece titled Unraveling, she unravels a cotton Confederate flag with members of the public in a museum. It’s a tedious task that takes time—which is no coincidence. The piece shows people how long it takes to deconstruct a complicated symbol in American history.

WFAE’s Sarah Delia spoke with Clark around this time last year about that piece. She circled backed with her a year later to learn how her work has been received and to hear what’s next.  

Actor's Theatre of Charlotte

Actor's Theatre of Charlotte is once again a theater without a stage. The group thought they were close to securing a new location…but as WFAE’s Sarah Delia reports, that’s now a no-go.

Courtesy of National High School Musical Theatre Awards

 

A Charlotte area high school student has won best actress at Monday night’s National High School Theatre Awards, nicknamed the Jimmy Awards, in New York.

Ira Glass on a stage
Ebru Yildiz

Ira Glass, the host of This American Life, is coming to Charlotte Saturday. His show is known for its powerful emotional content and distinct narrative storytelling. He’s bringing his radio show to the Belk Theater stage with a twist.

Glass spoke to WFAE’s Sarah Delia in an interview we’d like to call three acts, two radio people, and one interview.

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