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The Jan. 6 hearings' impact on NC’s U.S. Senate race and Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson still making controversial comments

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Liam James Doyle / NPR
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The Jan. 6 committee hearings have shown that there was a group of advisers who tried to convince then-President Trump to accept that he lost his 2020 election. But in the words of former Attorney General Bill Barr, he was “detached from reality” on the outcome of his election loss.

We also learned that Trump raised $250 million on his false claims of a stolen election, but most of that money went to other groups supporting him. And members of the far-right Proud Boys and Oath Keepers believed that Trump wanted them to go to the Capitol But does any of this matter in North Carolina politics, particularly in the race for the U.S. Senate since Rep. Ted Budd objected to certifying the election results?

We’ll talk to Western Carolina political science professor Chris Cooper about that. And we’ll also talk about Lt. Governor Mark Robinson. He’s not on the ballot, but he looks as if he’s already running for governor in 2024. He’s made a series of statements that have generated controversy, most recently at Freedom House Charlotte church in Charlotte: “We’re called to be the Christians that God has called us to be, and we are called — here I’m getting ready to get in trouble — called to be led by men.”

We’ll discuss the criticism he’s received, and Robinson’s response to it, with Ray Nothstine of the conservative Carolina Journal. He contends Robinson has become the most popular Republican in the state.

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Steve Harrison is WFAE's politics and government reporter. Prior to joining WFAE, Steve worked at the Charlotte Observer, where he started on the business desk, then covered politics extensively as the Observer’s lead city government reporter. Steve also spent 10 years with the Miami Herald. His work has appeared in The Washington Post, the Sporting News and Sports Illustrated.