Sarah Delia

Arts & Crime Reporter

At this point in her life, Sarah considers home to be a state of mind—not one place. Before joining the WFAE news team, she was hosting and reporting in the deep south in Birmingham, Alabama. In past lives she was a northerner having worked and lived in Indiana, Maine, and New York City. She grew up in Virginia and attended James Madison University in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley.

Sarah got her start in radio at WXJM, her college radio station where she hosted a talk show, a music program, and helped manage the student run station. It’s also where she made lifelong friends and discovered a love for talking into microphones.

Sarah has interned and worked at NPR in Washington DC, interned and freelanced for WNYC, and attended the Salt Institute for Radio Documentary Studies.

She enjoys telling stories that are off the beaten path. 

Ways to Connect

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus, all of our lives have changed in some way. Maybe that means you’re working from home for the first time or having to put off a major life event like a wedding or funeral.

It might mean you’re out of work, taking an unexpected financial hit … or juggling work while having your kids at home.

Since the outbreak of the coronavirus, all of our lives have changed in some way. Maybe that means you’re working from home for the first time or having to put off a major life event like a wedding or funeral.

It might mean you’re out of work, taking an unexpected financial hit … or juggling work while having your kids at home.

Pixabay

The coronavirus outbreak is making us all think a little differently — about how we interact with each other, how we work, and how we stay safe. Listeners have reached out to WFAE with a variety of questions and we thought it would be good to check in with you now to let you know what we’ve found.

Pexels

 

To help curb the spread of the coronavirus outbreak, employees in many companies are being encouraged to work from home when possible. WFAE is no different. Many of our staff members are practicing social distancing and working remotely. One of those, is reporter Sarah Delia. She’s been working from home and she’s looking for ways to connect with the community.

Pexels.com

South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster followed the example of other states Tuesday and announced the shutdown of in-house service at all restaurants and bars to help curb the spread of the coronavirus.

COURTESY OF THE RELATIVES

Finding housing can be tough even when you have a reliable job and a good credit score. It can be an even bigger challenge for a portion of the population that lacks rental and credit histories and stable income — young adults. Add the rising cost of rent to that list, and the deck can be stacked high against 18- to 24-year-olds trying to find a safe and secure place to live.

Judge Aretha Blake - District Court Judge / Facebook

A district court race in Mecklenburg County that received an unusual amount of media attention turned into an easy victory for the incumbent. 

Interior of the Diocese of Charlotte
Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The Catholic Diocese of Charlotte has made additions to a list of clergy it considers credibly accused of sexual abuse. The updates which occurred on Friday, are the latest additions to the list of clergy credibly accused of sexual abuse involving minors since it was released late last year. 

Judge Aretha Blake - District Court Judge / Facebook

This week at the Mecklenburg County Courthouse, one judge asked another to block a forthcoming report that she says would further damage her reputation as she runs for reelection.

 

It’s been more than a month since the Charlotte Diocese released its list of clergy credibly accused of sexual abuse involving minors. The diocese says the process to publish the list was a thorough one that included hiring an independent investigative firm to review its files. But the list has received criticism about being incomplete.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The Catholic Diocese of Charlotte has named 14 former clergy members it considers "credibly accused" of sexually abusing children.

The List: The When

Dec 5, 2019
Greg Harris

In Episode 4 of "The List," we explore what might happen when the Catholic Diocese of Charlotte releases a list of clergy members credibly accused of sexual misconduct and abuse. The diocese says it plans to release names by the end of 2019. We hear from an advocate with personal experience who's there to listen to other survivors of abuse and from North Carolina's attorney general. And we hear how the crisis has shaped survivors' views on not just the Catholic Church but faith in general.

The List: The Why

Dec 4, 2019
Greg Harris

In this episode of "The List," we learn about why survivors of abuse in the Catholic Church and proponents of accountability push for the release of lists of credibly accused clergy. We also hear some theories as to why certain people might push back against the release of such lists. And we hear from a local deacon about why he thinks the church should talk about the crisis openly. There's another why we learn about, too — why some people in power abuse children in the first place.

Greg Harris

Most Catholic dioceses in the country have released a list of clergy credibly accused of sexual abuse. The diocese of Charlotte has not released a list, but its bishop has said he’s committed to doing so by the end of the year. In the meantime, WFAE’s Sarah Delia has been learning how such a list is compiled, what it means, and how victims of clergy continue to deal with the abuse they suffered.

The List: The How

Dec 3, 2019
Greg Harris

In this episode of "The List," we learn more about the child sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church and why dioceses across the country have been releasing lists of credibly accused clergy.  We also learn more about the history of the Charlotte Diocese — which as of Dec. 1, 2019, still hadn't released a list despite plans to do so by the end of the year.  And we hear from a survivor of abuse at hands of a former priest who once served in Charlotte — and the attorney who represented him in a lawsuit against the diocese. 

Greg Harris

WFAE’s “The List” is a four-part series about the impact of the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church, the push for dioceses to release lists of credibly accused clergy. The Diocese of Charlotte is one of about 30 dioceses in the United States that, as of Dec. 1, 2019, hasn’t published such a list.

In this first episode we’re going to focus on the who and the what. Who wants this list published? What makes an informative list? Who is the Charlotte Diocese and what is it doing to combat the child abuse scandal? 

The List Trailer

Nov 30, 2019

Bishop Peter Jugis of the Charlotte Catholic Diocese announced in May that the diocese is committed to releasing by the end of 2019 a list of clergy who are credibly accused of sexual abuse involving minors. That list and what it represents is the subject of this four-part series.

SARAH DELIA / WFAE

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Chief Kerr Putney addressed reporters Wednesday about a story that dominated last week’s news cycle — his retirement and whether his plan to briefly return is legal.

Julie Barry
Sarah Delia / WFAE

The Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department told reporters Tuesday that uptown is still a safe place, even after a shooting that occurred in the center city earlier this week.

Dish restaurant sign
Sarah Delia / WFAE

The original owners of Dish—a restaurant in Plaza Midwood known for its southern comfort cooking—are hanging up their aprons. Luckily for Charlotte, the 17-year-old restaurant is staying put with the same name and many of the same recipes, but under new ownership.

Pages