Historic South End

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This week Charlotte had another big jobs announcement. Online mortgage company Better.com announced it is expanding in Charlotte, going from about 20 people to 1,000 in five years. It follows substantial job announcements for the city by Lowe’s, Avid Xchange and Truist.

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A digital mortgage-lending company says it's bringing 1,000 jobs to Charlotte over the next five years.

LendingTree will to a new project under development on South Tryon Street in Charlotte's South End.
The Spectrum Companies

The online loan marketplace LendingTree plans to move its headquarters next year from Ballantyne in south Charlotte to the South End. About 500 employees will relocate to a new building being developed by The Spectrum Companies, at South Tryon Street and Carson Boulevard.

The Durham County elections board is defending itself against charges by Governor Pat McCrory’s campaign of wrongful or illegal conduct in last Tuesday’s ballot count. After troubles on Election Day, the heavily Democratic County reported 94,000 ballots late.

Amy Rainey / Charlotte Observer

Local music fans in Charlotte this weekend are losing an old friend: Tremont Music Hall, which is closing after 20 years.

Penny Craver founded the club in 1995, in an old industrial building on West Tremont Avenue in Charlotte’s South End. Since then, it has hosted a long list of big names, both before and after they found success, from Green Day to John Mayer to metal band Primus. It’s also where many local bands got their starts.

Shook Kelley

 Charlotte's South End wasn't always a hip, vibrant district of shops, restaurants and condos filled with young people that's currently thriving along the city's light rail line. The district right outside of Center City along South Boulevard got its start in the 1850's when the first railroad line came to Charlotte and cotton mills and neighborhoods like Dilworth started to spring up around the rail corridor to house mill workers. But when the cotton mills moved out, South End turned into a vacant, barbed-wired and even dangerous wasteland. We'll talk to some of the people responsible for bringing it back to life about the history of the area from train to trolley to light rail. A look at the surprising story of 'Historic' South End from cotton mills to food trucks, when Charlotte Talks.

Shook Kelley

Charlotte's South End wasn't always a hip, vibrant district of shops, restaurants and condos filled with young people that's currently thriving along the city's light rail line. The district right outside of Center City along South Boulevard got its start in the 1850's when the first railroad line came to Charlotte and cotton mills and neighborhoods like Dilworth started to spring up around the rail corridor to house mill workers. But when the cotton mills moved out, South End turned into a vacant, barbed-wired and even dangerous wasteland. We'll talk to some of the people responsible for bringing it back to life about the history of the area from train to trolley to light rail. A look at the surprising story of 'Historic' South End from cotton mills to food trucks, when Charlotte Talks.

The Surprising Story Of Charlotte's South End

Jun 10, 2013
Julie Rose

Some of the hottest restaurants and hippest gatherings in Charlotte are just beyond Uptown, in the neighborhood known as South End.  Developers have taken note: enough apartments are under construction to double South End's population by 2015. 

City leaders say it's a shining example of what transit can do. But there's so much more to the story.