UNC Charlotte Shooting Survivor Calls For Action On Gun Bills

Aug 7, 2019

During a news conference at the state legislative building Tuesday, UNC Charlotte shooting survivor Drew Pescaro called on lawmakers to pass two gun control bills filed earlier this year. 

UNC Charlotte student and shooting survivor Drew Pescaro, seen here in a still from video, speaks during a Tuesday press conference with Democratic legislators in Raleigh to demand action on state gun bills.
Credit WRAL / FACEBOOK

Pescaro joined Democratic state lawmakers, who called the press conference following this weekend’s shootings in El Paso and Dayton. One of the bills, known as the Gun Violence Protection Act, would prohibit the sale of "assault weapons" to anyone under 21 and ban certain large-capacity magazines. 

The measure would also require a permit for all gun purchases and a three-day waiting period. The other bill, commonly called a "red flag" law, would allow family members and police to ask a court to restrict a person's access to firearms if there is evidence that person poses a danger to themselves or others.

Pescaro said he doesn’t understand why lawmakers have not acted on the bills, which were introduced this spring.

“It just amazes me that I still have to live my daily life affected by this tragedy and it’s taken this long to try to even get a vote on these two bills we have in front of us today, because for whatever reason the shooting in our state wasn't enough to bring us to a vote,” Pescaro said.

Pescaro showed the scars he has from being shot and said lawmakers have an obligation to at least discuss the bill. Pescaro was one of four students who survived a deadly mass shooting April 30 in a classroom of the Kennedy Building at UNC Charlotte. Two other students, Riley Howell and Reid Parlier, were killed before the suspected shooter was arrested.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper on Monday called for the General Assembly to act on the two bills.

President Trump on Monday said he supports so-called "red flag" laws.  Republican state lawmakers have signaled they likely will not consider the two bills.