Keith Lamont Scott

On September 20, 2016, Keith Lamont Scott, a black man, was shot and killed by a Charlotte Mecklenburg Police officer, also a black man. Protests and riots erupted in Charlotte following the fatal shooting. Here you will find WFAE's coverage of the shooting and its aftermath.

View our special report on the first year after the shooting and unrest:

One Year Later: Anniversary of the Keith Lamont Scott Shooting and Protests

Video montage of the police encounter with Keith Lamont Scott and the unrest:

Michael Falero / WFAE

 

A crowd of up to 250 people protested outside a CMPD office in north Charlotte on Friday evening, eventually breaking windows until police fired tear gas to disperse those who had gathered. The protest was one of many across the country following the death of George Floyd this past week by a police officer in Minneapolis.

Kerr Putney
Michael Falero / WFAE

Charlotte-Mecklenburg police have a new policy detailing how officers should de-escalate and avoid using force. The new policy includes a written definition of “de-escalation.” CMPD Chief Kerr Putney says that’s new, but the idea itself isn’t.

Justin Carr, Rayquan Borum
Facebook_JustinCarr/ Meckleburg County

Updated: Tuesday at 1:30 p.m.

The trial of Rayquan Borum is underway. A video played in court Monday showed Borum, charged with first-degree murder in the death of 26-year-old Justin Carr, saying he fired a gun while participating in protests held in response to the police shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott.

David Boraks / WFAE

Thursday marks the second anniversary of protests that exploded around Charlotte for days, following the fatal police shooting of 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott. Police say Scott was smoking marijuana in an apartment parking lot and had a gun. His family, including his wife who witnessed his shooting, contends he was waiting for his son and not a threat to police. They are suing the city and the officer, Brentley Vinson.

Protesters in uptown Charlotte on the day after the police killing of Keith Lamont Scott.
David Boraks / WFAE

Two years ago Thursday, protests erupted in the wake of the police shooting death of Keith Lamont Scott, a black man who lived in Charlotte.

Jeff Cravotta

Two years ago Thursday, Keith Lamont Scott was shot and killed by a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer. That shooting and the days of protests after his death, are seared into Charlotte’s collective memory. Or are they? 

FILE: Rakeyia Scott addressed reporters at the north Charlotte apartment complex where her husband was shot in September 2016.
Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The widow of Keith Scott has filed a lawsuit against the city and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police officer involved in the 2016 shooting that set off a string of protests and riots.

Justin Bamberg
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE News

The attorney for the family of Keith Lamont Scott, a black man who was fatally shot by police in Charlotte in 2016, says he is finalizing the paperwork to sue the city and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department by the end of the month.

Charlotte Uprising Facebook

The Mecklenburg County District Attorney dropped the charges against a Charlotte activist involved in protests after the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.

David Boraks/WFAE

A motion for a bond hearing has been denied for the second time for a man accused of fatally shooting a protestor during the Charlotte demonstrations over the Keith Lamont Scott shooting in 2016. 

Gwendolyn Glenn/ WFAE

The attorney for the family of Keith Lamont Scott says he plans to file a lawsuit against the city in an effort to secure a settlement for Scott’s family.

The family of Keith Lamont Scott.
Lisa Worf / WFAE

The City of Charlotte is declining to settle with the family of Keith Lamont Scott, who was fatally shot by a Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer in 2016, according to the lawyer who represents the family.

Corine Mack of the Charlotte NAACP spoke at Tuesday's press conference at the Government Center.
David Boraks / WFAE

Community activists say this week's final report of The Police Foundation is a good start but falls short in its assessment of CMPD's response to protests after the police killing of Keith Scott in 2016.  Leaders of several groups spoke to reporters outside the Government Center uptown Tuesday. 

David Boraks/WFAE

Updated 12:11 p.m.
The final report is out from an independent review of CMPD's handling of the September 2016 protests following the police killing of Keith Scott. The main finding by the Police Foundation of Washington, D.C., doesn’t vary much from its draft report released last fall – that CMPD "acted appropriately" and according to its policies as it responded to a week of demonstrations uptown.

Captured by traffic camera

Rayquan Borum, the man accused of fatally shooting Justin Carr during protests after the fatal police shooting of Keith Scott last year, has a new attorney. Local activists, who have maintained that Borum is innocent are raising money to pay for his defense.

Activist Gemini Boyd speaks to Police Foundation consultants Monday night at Little Rock AME Zion Church in uptown Charlotte.
David Boraks / WFAE

Consultants reviewing CMPD's response to last year's protests in uptown Charlotte heard from speakers calling for changes in their draft report, and also how CMPD holds officers responsible. 

Protesters gather outside of CMPD headquarters, chanting, "release the tapes."
David Boraks / WFAE

A police consultant group that studied CMPD’s response to the protests that followed the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott last year will hold its final town hall meeting in Charlotte on Monday evening.

Frank Straub of the Police Foundation of Washington, D.C., talked to Charlotte City Council Monday.
David Boraks / WFAE

A consultant with the Police Foundation told Charlotte City Council Monday night that CMPD properly followed its own policies last year as it responded to violence following the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. But he said CMPD and city officials weren't fully prepared for the protests.

Police in riot gear march down Trade Street toward the Omni Hotel during protests Sept. 21, 2016, after the killing of Keith Lamont Scott.
David Boraks / WFAE

CMPD and the City of Charlotte say they're studying a consultant's recommendations for changes in police training, transparency and other policies. Those came in a report from The Police Foundation of Washington, D.C., hired by the city after demonstrations following the fatal police shooting of a black man last year. 

Erin Keever / WFAE

A year after the killing of Keith Scott, Charlotte is still debating both police shootings and the social and economic inequality that led to a week of protests. Just how well CMPD and the city are doing was the question Wednesday night during a two-hour Charlotte Talks Public Conversation at Spirit Square in uptown Charlotte.

Rakeyia Scott addressed reporters at the north Charlotte apartment complex where her husband was shot one year ago Wednesday.
Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The widow of Keith Lamont Scott, who was fatally shot one year ago, revisited the site of the shooting Wednesday. Rakeyia Scott was accompanied to the north Charlotte apartment complex on Lexington Circle by an attorney and family members, including Scott's children and four-month-old grandchild.

Standing several feet away from where her husband was shot last year, Scott told reporters that the past year had been a year of grieving.

Since the fatal shooting of Justin Carr during protests in uptown Charlotte last September, questions have lingered about who shot him. Raquan Borum was arrested and charged with first-degree murder, but people who were in the area at the time of the shooting have challenged the police account of what happened. 

Jenifer Roser / Erin Keever

Thursday, September 21, 2017

The shooting of Keith Lamont Scott on September 20, 2016 and the protests that followed shook Charlotte. It started conversations, sometimes uncomfortable ones, across the city that continue today. On the one year anniversary of the shooting, a WFAE Public Conversation examined what has changed, what hasn’t, and looked at some of the work that’s been done over the past year.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

Wednesday marks the one-year anniversary of the police killing of Keith Lamont Scott – and the birth of a protest movement called Charlotte Uprising.

The street protests that followed Keith Scott's killing brought all kinds of people to uptown Charlotte - longtime activists, students, uptown professionals, and local clergy. Within a couple of days, many were rallying around a social media hashtag - #CharlotteUprising.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts
twitter.com/CLTMayor

Wednesday marks the one-year anniversary of the CMPD shooting death of Keith Scott.

In the last year, the protests the shooting inspired have been the impetus for a lot discussion, and reflection. Whether they’ve inspired change depends on your point of view.

[One Year Later: The Anniverary of the Keith Lamont Shooting and Protests]

The Charlotte Observer / Jeff Siner

[One Year Later: The Anniverary of the Keith Lamont Shooting and Protests]

“I stayed because the questions needed to be answered and I felt like if there was a role that I could play, it was in making sure the community wasn’t shoo-shooed away saying, ‘Hey, it’s tough, deal with it later.’”

The next day he woke up and his image was all over the world.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

A city council meeting following the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott last year was out of control at times as a long list of residents spoke, calling for justice. And then there was this 9-year-old, Zianna Oliphant who grabbed everyone’s attention.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

CMPD Chief Kerr Putney speaks with a lot of bluntness these days. Take this example from a Charlotte Talks Public Conversation this summer. He addressed the lack of economic opportunity and other social challenges that disproportionately affect minority neighborhoods.

“I’m not going to say Kumbaya and let’s overcome everything. What I’m going to say is if you have financial means, support the work that needs to be done that changes these outcomes, and then you get out of the way and shut your mouth. And then let those of us who are willing to change outcomes, do so," Putney said at the July 12 event.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Story updated 6:30 p.m.

Last month the Charlotte Citizens Review Board issued a split decision on whether CMPT Officer Brentley Vinson should have been disciplined for the fatal shooting of Keith Scott. But the board unanimously approved policy recommendations for the department. CMPD Chief Kerr Putney revealed some of the board’s suggestions and responded to them today. WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn was at the press conference and joins Nick de la Canal in the studio.

Alvin C. Jacobs Jr. To Speak No Evil © All Rights Reserved 2017 tospeaknoevil.com

Photographer Alvin Jacobs of Charlotte does what you’d expect a photographer to do: Lots of personal portraits and fashion photography are in his portfolio.

And then, he has a passion project. He travels to cities with social unrest. He’s captured protests in places like Ferguson, Baltimore, Charlotte. Last weekend, it was Charlottesville.

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