SouthBound: Poet Maurice Manning On Writing About Abe Lincoln, And Finding Inspiration In The Woods

Oct 16, 2019

Maurice Manning writes poems about turnips, and copperheads, and tire swings, and a woman who gets her apron strings caught in an old wringer washer. His work is dug from the ground of the Kentucky farmland where he lives. But it’s also elevated, universal, as high and expansive as the stars.

Manning was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for an earlier book of poems called “The Common Man.” He’s got a new book out just this week called “Railsplitter,” which is a series of poems written in Abraham Lincoln’s voice from beyond the grave. It’s a tribute to another plainspoken man with visions of something bigger.

Let's keep the conversation going. Who do you want to hear from next on the SouthBound podcast?

Submit your idea in the box below. You can also send a tweet to @tommytomlinson or @wfae, and email me at ttomlinson@wfae.org.

Show notes:

New episodes of SouthBound come out every other Wednesday. Subscribe:

Apple Podcasts     Google Play     Stitcher     NPR One

SouthBound is a production of WFAE. Our host is Tommy Tomlinson. Our audience engagement manager is Joni Deutsch, and our main theme comes from Josh Turner.